New York Herald clippings on Crete, December, 1910

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CRETAN VICTORY IN SIGHT, GREEKS SAY

From All Parts of the United States Comes Commendation for This Newspaper's Publication of Facts.

{BY TELEGRAPH TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.}

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah. Wednesday. -- The Greek community of Utah in a special meeting [today] adopted a resolution to express its deep gratitude to the NEW YORK HERALD for its aid to the Cretan cause. The presentation of the demands of Crete to the Christian world for judgement, coming from a newspaper of the world wide reputation and power of the HERALD, is a guarantee and assurance that the century long struggle of a Christian race for liberty will soon be at an end.

(Signed)

The Greek Community of Utah,
DR. P. [KASSINIKOS], President.

THANKS FROM MEMPHIS.

{BY TELEGRAPH TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.}

MEMPHIS, Tenn., Wednesday. -- The publication by the NEW YORK HERALD of the demand of Crete for union with Greece is an act of the highest justice toward humanity. The Greek colony of Memphis and all the other Greek residents of this country are not indifferent. We offer you our sincerest thanks.

(Signed)
A. PATSURIS.
P. BROUJOS.
C. EVANGELIDES.

"ALL GREEKS GRATEFUL."

TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD:--

I beg to express my deep gratitude to the HERALD for its noble work in advocating the union of heroic Crete with its mother, Greece.

The HERALD is known the world over for its spirit of justice. I pray that you may succeed in winning over the Christian nations to espouse the cause of Crete.

I am absolutely sure all Greeks are deeply grateful and highly appreciate the HERALD's noble work in behalf of our nation.

I hope and pray that you may continue this noble work.

(Signed) DEMITRIUS COURAKOS

(A Greek-American).

REQUESTS AID FOR CRETE.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD:--

I read the accounts of conditions and events in the island of Crete published in your paper with profound interest, and my sense of duty impels me, as a Christian and citizen of the United States as well as a friend of the Greeks, to offer you my warm congratulations for your meritorious work in behalf of this much oppressed people. I am confident that every Greek patriot's heart throbs with unbounded gratitude, and it is my sincere hope that your efforts will be crowned with success.

The Cretan question has long been the cause of much agitation, and it still remains to be solved, though there can be but two solutions. Either the Cretans will enjoy the liberty they have won through centuries of continuous rebellion with unparalleled fortitude against unbearable conditions or they will fall martyrs to the indifference and selfishness of the more powerful States of Europe, for there can be no doubt that they will fight to the end.

If the good people of these United States only knew the trials and sufferings the Cretans are undergoing and the object they have in view, which is none other than the realization of the Hellenic ideals. I am quite certain their cause would soon be decided, but the great majority of people seem to have no idea of the situation over there.

The demand of Crete to be united with her mother country is a just one and should receive our undivided support and recognition. I would impress the necessity of an immediate demonstration of our sentiments in this matter, which will be of inestimable service to the cause of a worthy people and prove to the world that we still retain the principles of liberty upon which this republic has been founded.

EDWARD W. WHITE. M.D.,

Director of physical education, Illinois Athletic Club.
CHICAGO, Dec. 12, 1910.

PRESENTS A REMONSTRANCE.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD:--

Through the medium of the HERALD permit me once again, and in the strongest language I can command, to protest against converting old Bensonia Cemetery, now the public place at Rae street, into a dumping ground for the unclean snow and dirty understrata of filth of its vicinity.

Here, in what should be a privileged spot, awaiting their call at the judgement day, still repose the remains of hundreds of the residents of the old town of Morrisania. In one corner alone of this historic landmark of the Bronx are buried more than 150 members of a charitable and patriotic society of half a century ago. More than this, scattered around to the north and west are scores of bodies, including not only clergymen and laymen, but also those soldiers who served their country during the civil war.

In conclusion I, as sole trustee for many years of this new breathing space, feel it to be an imperative duty on my part to remonstrate against a condition of affairs that would be disgraceful to the most barbarous of nations.

SIDWELL S. RANDALL.

BRONX BOROUGH, Dec. 12, 1910.

CONGRATULATES THE HERALD

TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD:--

Your recent benevolent and noble act on behalf of American liberty and civilization toward the patriotic cause of the struggling Cretans is worth the congratulation and support of every true and patriotic American citizen, and as such I beg to offer you my sincere felicitations.

I hope that the appeal of the Cretans which was published in the columns of your worldwide known journal, will interest in favor of the noble descendants of old King Minos all the civilized world, bringing forth the much desired result: the annexation of the island to the fatherland.

L. M. PERKINS.

BROOKLYN, Dec. 11, 1910.