Amy Woods to Jane Addams, February 19, 1924

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February 19, 1924.

Miss Jane Addams,
Hull House
Chicago, Illinois.

Dear Miss Addams:

Gertrud Baer is here in the office, and will be with us until March 1st, when she will meet with the young people's group at Bear Mountain, March 1 and 2. She will be in New York the rest of the time until the 9th.

I am anxious now to straighten out as quickly as possible the details in regard to the foreign delegates. They are all waiting for very definite invitations and instructions. As nearly as I can understand it, word has been sent to all the European countries that we will send $400 for each delegate. Mme. Ramondt is waiting for definite instruction as to how long they are [to] remain in this country. Each anticipates being entertained for the entire time that she is here. I am uncertain whether Miss [Glücklich] has written the other sections than the European ones, that we extend this same offer to them.

She was somewhat surprised and grieved that this was placed in other hands without consultation with her.

Mme. Duchêne is helping Mme. Ramondt.

Miss Baer brings the following details:

(Holland) Ramondt, Jacobs -- (France) Duchêne, Capy, Jouve -- (Austria) Hertzka, Heller -- (England) Ethel Williams, [Sheepshanks] -- (Belgium) [Dejardin] -- (Czechoslovakia) [Wiechowski], [Vankova] -- (Ireland) not heard from -- (Bulgaria) Papasoff -- (Denmark) not heard from -- (Greece) If support is sent -- (Hungary) Mme. Schwimmer might represent Hungary, but others are ready to come if costs are paid. (Italy) no word -- (Norway) Larsen may be able to come -- (Poland) Dr. [Budziński] -- (Sweden) one delegate -- (Switzerland) one delegate -- ([Ukraine]) [Surovkova]. [page 2]

The fact seems to be that we can have just as many as we can furnish transportation for, and hospitality. Meantime, Mr. Norton is [anxious] to have definite word in regard to return bookings. The delegates are uncertain how long we wish to entertain them, and whether they are all [expected] to go to Chicago to the Summer School. They are ready [to] do whatever they can in the way of speaking.

Miss Baer's expenses over came to $234.55 including visas, $10 -- head-tax, $5 -- second class passage, $158 -- landing sum, $50. Miss Glücklich advanced $268 to her which we shall return from the National Account tomorrow, and hold the remainder of the $500 which Miss Winsor gave to cover her expenses and return transportation. Miss Baer is very well, and full of hope that the Congress will be a great success.

You have undoubtedly heard that the International Executive Committee met in London on the 4th and 5th, and worked out the instructions which you will note on the enclosed minutes of the National Executive Committee.

I cabled Dr. Williams to present the political side. The International Committee were in favor of asking Miss Sheepshanks -- the National Committee, Dr. Williams. I am afraid I should have asked your approval first, but I took it for granted that we had decided upon Dr. Williams. I hope you will agree with us, and not feel too sorry that I did this.

Radio word has come from Frau [illegible] ↑Hertzka↓ accepting the invitation to present the economic side. Mme. Capy was cabled, c/o Mme. [illegible] Duchêne, and Gertrud Baer is writing her today in French. I will write to Dr. Augspurg.

It was the unanimous vote, without discussion, both by the International Executive Committee and by the National, that you should be asked to present the ten year work of the League. I hope that you will be able to do this, and that we may very shortly get out a folder full of the really live plans for the Congress.

I am writing Miss [Breckinridge], asking her to take the economic side.

The suggestion of having second women, preferably American, to present the political side was left open, largely, because we could not think of [just] the person we wanted. Will you give us suggestions, please.

Now, to go back to the practical side of [caring for] our guests. There appears to be little opportunity for any to come unless practically all of their entertainment is paid. I think each country will do all it can. The arrangement here in Washington is that -- the National Office will pay one-half of the hotel expenses, provided we cannot obtain private entertainment. It seems to me that it would be part of the Congress expenses to have them all at headquarters (the Washington Hotel), and well worth-while.

With such a big undertaking on hand, we ought to make the supreme effort of the times to raise enough money to carry this through with a "flourish."

This is the plan which I am suggesting, providing you feel we ought to go ahead with the matter of caring for them until after the Summer School. [page 3]

On May 8th, the day after the Congress, we will have our Annual Meeting.

May 9th, Goucher College, Baltimore, plans a luncheon and reception. Probably we could arrange for entertainment for the delegates for the night.

May 10th, Philadelphia. Undoubtedly we could arrange for entertainment there.

We could then return to Washington. We can make arrangements with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad for a private [car] (with a minimum number of twenty-five passengers) at $54 a day. The Railroad rate is $27.78 per person to Chicago, making $44.53 covering the head tax.

We could leave on this private [car], stop over at Pittsburg, May 11th,

Columbus, O. May 12th

Cincinnati, May 13th,

Indianapolis, May 14th,

and arrive in Chicago, May 15th.

Then, after the Summer School, arrangements could be made with stop-overs at Toledo, Cleveland, and either to Buffalo, Toronto, and then Montreal - or else to Toledo, Cleveland, and New York -- getting the guests back to the port of sailing at a specific [date]. This would cost about $44.25 for each delegate.

It seems to me that it would be the very best educational [illegible] ↑opportunity↓ we could give the W.I.L. and also serve the purpose of entertain our guests with the least expense and the greatest publicity, and to see the cities of America.

Breakfasts on the train would cost approximately twenty-five to thirty cents apiece, and we would so arrange that luncheons and dinners would be provided by the cities. It might be that the cities could raise enough money to practically finance this trip.

Mrs. [Trimble] is excellent for arranging such a schedule, and the agent of the Railroad [would] accompany us and take care of all details. Using the drawing-room for an office during the day time, I think we could get the publicity which would be of enormous value.

I am assuming that the money can be raised for such an undertaking now that we are in the midst of it. We must make very effort to make it a big worth-while international adventure.

However, I cannot assume the responsibility of deciding all of these matters. Up to the present, we have been working to get the machinery under way, and we have been able to cover expenses. But [illegible] unless we have a big drive for funds, we cannot go on much farther.

I suggest, if you approve, that you write a letter now, which we can send to all of our members with the plan as we have worked it out for the Congress.

I am writing Mr. Norton today, asking him to reserve twenty-five bookings around June 4th either from Montreal or New York. I believe Montreal boats would be less expensive, and it would be much more interesting for the guests to have a view of the St. Lawrence and a bit of Canada. [page 4]

Will you please send a check as quickly as possible to me, which I will deposit in the bank here, and forward in accordance with whatever instructions you give. We cannot count on Mrs. Lewis help in any way at the present time. She is over-burdened with very grave sickness in her family, and is the main-stay of them all.

Everything seems to be moving rapidly, and easily, provided the money is raised, and I think that people are becoming so earnestly interested that with a little urging we can do a bigger piece of work. I say this with all moderation. I am not an over-sanguine person, and I am very much aware of my inefficiency to handle such a big undertaking with so few people near at hand to work things out with me.

Sincerely,

National Secretary.

enclosure.

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