Kate Fisher Kimball to Jane Addams, February 19, 1907

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Chautauqua Press
PUBLICATION DEPARTMENT
Chautauqua Institution
Chautauqua, New York

Hyde Park, Chicago.
February 19, 1907.

My dear Miss Addams: —

We have been reading your book again without the disadvantage that comes from having only galley proof, and we have unanimously agreed that we need not fear it will be too difficult for our people. There is, of course, a certain amount of technical phrasing which is almost necessary in books dealing with economic questions, but the human interest of your "Newer Ideals" is so strong that we all feel its force very deeply and we feel sure that thoughtful readers will have no difficulty with it. We shall probably print in our Membership Book a few pages of definitions of terms used, etc., which will help those of our readers to whom these terms seem especially unfamiliar. We feel that without any changes the book will be one of the greatest possible value to our people.

I ought, perhaps, to modify this last statement in just one respect, and that is regarding page 153 to which I referred before, where there is a reference to the southern states. We think that a very slight change in a line or two will do away with any possible misunderstanding. The paragraph to which I refer is that beginning "In the Southern States, where a contemptuous attitude towards the <a> weaker people has had a <the> most marked effect upon public feeling," etc. <Some> such a change as, "In the Southern States, where an [illegible] <the peculiar> importance of the race problem has had a most marked effect," etc., would be [page 2] quite sufficient, but, of course, we would rather have you frame the change yourself if you are willing to do so.

We are ready to place the order for the printing at once so we shall be very glad if you can give this your early attention.

Very cordially yours,
Kate F. Kimball [signed]

<P.S. Personally, I feel tremendously grateful to you for this book. It is so suggestive & seems to open a door of hope out of the present tragedies of the industrial situation. I shall be thankful if we can help to bring in a better time by circulating its message.>

Miss Jane Addams,
Hull House,
Chicago.

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