Story About Count Bánffy, September 10, 1921 (summary)

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POOR ARTIST NOW FOREIGN MINISTER

AMERICANS GREET OBSCURE FRIEND OF 1919.

[Type] of Brush, Refugee During War, Becomes Responsible Diplomat.

{Copyright 1921, by Public Ledger Co.}

BUDAPEST, Sept. 10. -- Miss Jane Addams, of Hull House, Chicago, and Dr. Alice Hamilton, of Harvard university, who came to Europe together to attend the conference of the Women's International league in Vienna, and the Women's International training school in session in Salzburg throughout the summer, have been making little trips to Central European cities in order to study social conditions and arrived the other day in Budapest.

Miss Addams and Dr. Hamilton were together in Zurich in 1919. There they made the acquaintance of a struggling Hungarian artist, who was a refugee from Hungary, where communism was raging. The artist confessed himself only an amateur, and although his pictures showed talent they proclaimed him as such. "Still," he said, "one must live." And he went on painting Swiss mountains and lakes and selling them to tourists, at the same time studying commercial engraving. The two Americans found him entertaining and often visited him in his studio.

What was their surprise and pleasure the other day to encounter their artist friend in the lobby of their hotel in Budapest. He was equally glad to see the Americans, and they had tea together, recalling the old days in Zurich.

They discoursed on the political situation and the artist showed a surprising political knowledge, particularly regarding foreign affairs. Finally Miss Addams remarked: "For an artist you are singularly well informed on politics."

Their acquaintance replied with a slow smile. "Well I ought to be, I suppose. I am, you see, the minister for foreign affairs."

It was Count Bánffy, who is, indeed the Hungarian foreign minister.

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