34 results

  • Tags: Youth
  • Item Type: Text
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Addams addresses the Merchants Club of Chicago regarding the stealing and gambling habits of young, immigrant boys.
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Barnes writes to Addams about her book, Democracy and Social Ethics, and expresses some concerns about her ideas.
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In the second article of a series, Addams reports on some of the activities accomplished at Hull-House from 1889-1894.
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Addams and Edward Dunne speak on Chicago's capacity to fund recreation and park spaces.
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Addams writes to Lindsey expressing concern at the body of a newspaper clipping.
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Bowen tells Addams she wants to donate money to build a place for boys.
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Byles writes to Addams to ask for information about the Juvenile Improvement Association.
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Addams describes the current moral situation of American youth as a result of the current education and religious situations. This speech was also given before the Chicago Sinai congregation.
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Addams discusses the problem of juvenile delinquency.
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Addams argues that young boys need an outlet for their pent-up energy and adventurousness, and that without an outlet, like a playground, they are susceptible to petty crime.
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Addams discusses the problems that modern youth face when seeking love.
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Murphy writes Addams to tell her that her new book is an inspiration to him and shares some of his own ideas about children and the treatment of African Americans in the North and South.
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Addams urges Senator Dolliver to support a bill in Congress to create the Federal Children’s Bureau.
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Lehman praises Addams' The Spirit of Youth and the City Streets and asks her if the commercialization of recreation is at the heart of the problem.
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Princess Alice writes Addams looking for aid for homeless British women in Paris.
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Newspaper report of Addams' speech on the need for entertainments among the poor in Chicago. The speech was given for the Sunday Evening Club.
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In this draft, Addams offers a strong indictment against old fashioned religious education and argues that the church, in order to encourage modern youth to see the validity of religion, must engage the realities and distractions of urban life.
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Addams speaks at the Chicago Credit Men's Association about the dangers of unregulated dance halls for Chicago's youth.
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Addams argues that if children have a chance to play outside they are less likely to become criminals.
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Addams' brief opening address at the Chicago Child Welfare Exhibit.
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Addams offers a strong indictment against old fashioned religious education and argues that the church, in order to encourage modern youth to see the validity of religion, must engage the realities and distractions of urban life.
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Reed praises Addams for her new series of articles in McClure's Magazine and vents his frustration with the business class and their lack of care for the working class.
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Livingston writes Addams about her article on white slavery, because she herself is working in the Chinatown area of New York City working to help women get out of prostitution.
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Lewis criticizes a source Addams used for one of her articles in McClure's Magazines. 
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Lose writes Addams with ideas about how the minimum wage and moral teaching can save women from a life of prostitution.
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Addams provides the foreword for a report on the status of working girls, made by the National Federation of Settlements.
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Addams discusses the role of a lack of recreation for youth as a source of political corruption and argues for the establishment of regulated public spaces to encourage cooperative and positive relationships.
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Addams explains how educational background, economic situations, and family predicaments have an impact on juvenile crime; and she argues for special treatment of the "juvenile adult." The article was published in October 1913.

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