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  • Tags: Women's Rights
  • Item Type: Text
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Addams discusses public reaction against trade-unions, strikes, and their activities.
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Addams explains the distribution of a circular with regards to protection to working women.
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Gannett writes Addams to praise her book and entice her to attend the National Women's Suffrage Association meeting in February.
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Woman's Journal summary of Addams' Mount Holyoke commencement speech covering women's empowerment, college training and morality. The speech was given on June 19, and published on June 29, 1907.
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Thomas invites Addams to make a tour of East Coast women's colleges on the subject of equal suffrage.
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Addams warns independent women against men who will try to take advantage of them in matters of money. This is a reprint of an article first published in 1907.
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Addams discusses traditional women's roles and how they correspond to a greater need for the involvement of woman in politics.
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Addams discusses poor women in Chicago and their need for suffrage at a meeting of the College Equal Suffrage Society at Boston University on March 21. The excerpt was published later.
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An excerpt from Addams' March 22 speech at Faneuil Hall to the Boston Equal Suffrage Association and the Women's Trade Union League on the changes in women's work brought about by factory work.
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Charles K. Gibson's poem argues for women's rights and public activities.
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Addams gives arguments for woman's suffrage, stressing that working class need it to be able to control some aspects of their lives.
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In this address, delivered for the Merrick Lectures, 1907-8, Addams describes the difficulty immigrant women face as they try to assimilate into American life.
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Burritt writes Addams for advice about drawing a connection between immigrant women and the suffrage movement and compliments her on Newer Ideals of Peace.
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Tarbell writes Addams about her life since her visit to Hull-House.
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Addams sends Haldeman a postcard regarding the suffrage movement.
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In terms of securing their rights, Addams argues that women in America lag behind their European counterparts.
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Addams discusses the movement for municipal suffrage for women in Chicago, arguing that it will help improve schools, public health, and sanitation.
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Addams asks Nestor to speak at a public hearing in Springfield, Illinois, to discuss municipal voting for women.
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Addams argues that it is time for women to work in groups and advocate for causes that are important to them, like peace. Addams gave this address at the Second National Peace Congress in Chicago on April 27, 1909. This version was published in the proceedings.
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Addams argues that American women are behind their European peers with regard to individual rights.
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Letter welcoming people to join the American Association for Labor Legislation for a small fee.
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Salisbury praises Addams' new book and shares some of her own experiences working in a candy factory.
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Addams warns independent women against men who will try to take advantage of them in matters of money.
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In an interview with James Evan Crown, Addams discusses the impact that woman suffrage is having on society. Addams later denied having taken part in this interview, specifically her comments on the poor.
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Addams' short argument for woman suffrage that women's voices are needed for the health and beauty of the cities.
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Addams gave this lecture at least two times; once at the February 2 meeting of the New York City Women's Political Union, and again on February 14 at the Boston School Voters' League. In the lecture, she discusses the philosophical relationship between women and the State and argues for the value of women in government, leading to the importance of woman suffrage.
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In this first installment of "Why Women Should Vote," Addams argues that antiquated notions of being a "lady" work against the woman suffrage movement.
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Addams argues for woman suffrage claiming that women need to protect their legal rights.
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Roosevelt compliments Addams' article in McClure's, which argues that woman's suffrage will lift up women from vice. But he also offers a caution that women's suffrage could fail to impart real change as suffrage failed to impart real change for African Americans in the South.
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Arguing that white slavery requires an organized movement to defeat it, Addams provides examples from cases in Chicago. This is the first in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil in 1912.

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