2051 results

  • Tags: Peace
  • Item Type: Text
REEL 46_1762.jpg

Addams discusses the nature of the peace movement and the key players within it before the Chicago Association of Commerce.
REEL0005_0783.jpg

Addams asks Wilder for help getting Andrew Carnegie to donate money to the National Peace Conference because she has not had any success reaching Carnegie herself.
REEL0005_0792.jpg

Addams thanks Gilder for securing $1,000 from Andrew Carnegie for the second National Peace Conference.
REEL 46_1746.jpg

Addams argues that it is time for women to work in groups and advocate for causes that are important to them, like peace. Addams gave this address at the Second National Peace Congress in Chicago on April 27, 1909. This version was published in the proceedings.
JAPA-0528.jpg

Addams requests a membership in the National Council for Arbitration and Peace.
REEL 47_0337.jpg

In this speech given at the Auditorium Theater, under the auspices of the Hamilton Club, Addams argues for a system of international arbitration to avoid war.
REEL 47_0354.jpg

Page proofs of "Chapter V: Social Control," the final article in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil later in the year.
REEL 47_0362.jpg

Addams discusses how social movements can help alleviate vice, providing examples such as crusades against diseases and organized opposition to the white slave trade. This is the final article in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil later in the year.
REEL0006_0871.jpg

Addams writes in support of Harbert's project, probably the effort to erect a colossal peace statue at the entrance of the Panama Canal, but informs her that she cannot devote much time to the effort.
JAPA-0477-01.jpg

Newspaper report of Addams's speech before the Sunday Evening Club discussing new ideas about how to promote peace.
REEL0006_1322.jpg

Coffin writes Addams about his confusion that she, as an advocate for peace, would endorse a presidential candidate who extols the virtues of the military and of war.
REEL 47_0525.jpg

Addams reports on the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and her dismay about the conventions unjust treatment of African-Americans. This is one of a series of articles she prepared as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
REEL0007_0189.jpg

Beals is disappointed that Addams cannot attend their reception because she will be working for the Progressive Party, and believes the Baroness von Suttner should not have publicly criticized Addams for her political beliefs.
REEL0007_0238.jpg

Jones reacts to an article that Addams sent him on the Progressive Party, focusing on her statements about African Americans and the peace movement.
McClures-Nov1912-1.jpg

Addams describes her experiences at the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and its appeal to labor and women.
REEL0007_0457.jpg

Jordan disagrees with Addams about the "progressive" qualities of Theodore Roosevelt, preferring instead the policies of Woodrow Wilson.
REEL0007_0714.jpg

A circular sent to members of the National Council of Women to gather strength against a proposed Militia Pay Bill and increased militarism in the United States.
REEL 47_0745.jpg

In a humorous effort to render the male arguments against woman suffrage absurd, Addams describes a hypothetical world in which women hold power and men are asking for the vote.
REEL 47_0790.jpg

In a humorous effort to render the male arguments against woman suffrage absurd, Addams describes a hypothetical world in which women hold power and men are asking for the vote. This is the sixth article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and women's roles affecting change.
REEL0007_1078.jpg

Bok praises Addams' article on peace slated for the December issue of the Ladies' Home Journal.
REEL 47_0885.jpg

Addams advocates for world peace, arguing the advantages of international arbitration over war.
REEL 47_0890.jpg

Addams advocates for world peace, arguing the advantages of international arbitration over war. This is the final article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and a woman's role to affect change.
REEL0007_1795.jpg

The committee has established their methodology of achieving international peace at the end of World War I.
REEL0008_0607.jpg

Logan outlines a plan for international peace, including a tax plan and a Board of Mediators.
REEL 47_1058.jpg

Addams, comparing the act of human sacrifice to what is going on in the early stages of World War One, points out how pointless both acts are.
REEL0007_1664.jpg

Summary of responses to a draft resolution on peace.
REEL0007_1574.jpg

Schwimmer tells Addams that she is on a peace mission from Europe with President Wilson and Bryan.
REEL 47_1054.jpg

Addams argues that international peace is not a failed idea, and even though World War I is in the early stages of fighting it is not too late to stop war from continuing.
90af88563e6adc689efdad0e8db39c98.jpg

A portion of Addams' speech from the Second Annual Peace Conference on May 4, 1909 about what women have done that have earned them suffrage.
REEL0007_1588.jpg

Kellogg describes the events at the First Governors' Conference and the activities of the peace movement and the upcoming Governor's Conference in Madison.

Browse tags for all documents:

Output Formats

atom, dc-rdf, dcmes-xml, json, omeka-xml, rss2