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  • Tags: Morality
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A reprint of Addams' speech to the Congress of Men and the Religion Forward Movement chastises the church for rejection aid to "fallen" women and asks for a return to the teachings of Jesus, who opened his heart to all sinners.
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Addams discusses the perils that face immigrant women and the need for protections.
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Palmer's poem questions how the world, that can create such beauty, can also breed such hate and violence.
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The Leitch sisters discuss slavery in the United States, colonization by Great Britain, and alcohol as great evils.
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Addams discusses the devastating impact of World War I on women's traditional responsibilities.
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Addams discusses the devastating impact of World War I on women's traditional responsibilities and argues for their responsibility to stop it.
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Addams discusses her work with the International Congress of Women, the delegations to European leaders, and her views on the need for peace. The event was held at the Chicago Auditorium and attended by both peace activists and the general public, and chaired by Charles L. Hutchinson.
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A published version of Addams's Carnegie Hall speech, held July 9, on her return from Europe. In it Adams detailed the work of the International Congress of Women and her ideas on peace.
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Addams talks with New York Times reporter Edward Marshall about World War I and the efforts of the International Council of Women to start peace negotiations.
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Addams's speech on her return from Europe detailed the work of the International Congress of Women and her ideas on peace.
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Addams, Kellogg, and Wald argue the many reasons why World War One is destroying society, and detail how it is robbing a generation of its people and future. They also argue that the global community has the power to stop this war and prevent other wars.
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Addams details the many reasons why it is important that women be given the right to vote, and of how the suffrage movement is not just found in Western nations, but globally.
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Passages taken from Addams book "Newer Ideas of Peace," in which she argues against war on the grounds that it is something that is beneath the ideas of modern man, something not to be admired, and a waste of time and energy.
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Addams, comparing the act of human sacrifice to what is going on in the early stages of World War One, points out how pointless both acts are.
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Addams speaks before the Advertisers' Club of an incident that happened at Hull-House.
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Addams, compares ideas of religion in the past and present and discusses ideas on morality and the human condition.
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Addams, comparing past and present ideas of religion, discuses ideas on morality and the human condition.
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Report of Addams' speech in Milwaukee, that discusses the plight of prostitutes in a society when only men can vote. 
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Addams speaks at the Chicago Credit Men's Association about the dangers of unregulated dance halls for Chicago's youth.
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Baller congratulates Addams on being selected to be one of the Chicago Delegates, provides religious views on the war, and blesses Addams on her journey to The Hague.
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Addams exposes the double standard applied to women who break society's moral codes and argues for a more charitable view of women and a better understanding of their economic circumstances. This is the eleventh article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and a woman's role to affect change.
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Addams exposes the double standard applied to women who break society's moral codes and argues for a more charitable view of women and a better understanding of their economic circumstances. A version of this was published in November 1913.
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Addams argues for the regulation of public recreation to provide safe venues for women, youth, and communities. This is the seventh article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and how women can affect change.
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Addams argues for the regulation of public recreation to provide safe venues for women, youth, and communities.
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In 1894, Addams gave a speech to the Chicago Woman's Club and the Twentieth Century Club about the Pullman strike. The speech was not published until 18 years later, in the November 1912 Survey. In it, she draws comparisons between the key players in the strike, particularly George Pullman, and Shakespeare's dysfunctional royal family.
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Addams' 1894 talk on the Pullman strike was only published in 1912 in the Survey. She analyzes the strike, drawing comparisons between George Pullman and his workers, and Shakespeare's King Lear and Cordelia.

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A short quote by Addams on social ethics.
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