25 results

  • Tags: Lobbying
  • Item Type: Text
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Addams testifies that the system of child labor destroys genius, and how work on the stage damages children.
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At a joint meeting of the Consumers League and General Federation of Women's Clubs, Addams argues for the passage of the Heyburn Pure Food Bill in Congress.
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An excerpt from a letter by Addams, Lillian Wald and Mary McDowell to labor unions, seeking an investigation of working conditions for women and children.
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In a report on her testimony before the Illinois Senate Judiciary committee, Addams argues that life on the stages poses dangers to child actors.
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Brown writes Addams about the revival of the stage child bill and about plans for a new pamphlet opposing it.
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Brown informs Addams that the street trades bill she favored failed in the Illinois Senate, but the child stage bill she opposed also failed.
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Chute and Brown send Addams a telegram regarding the defeat of stage bill in the Illinois Senate.
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Oglesby informs Addams that allowing her request to speak at the hearings on the child actor bill was not within his power.
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Addams asks for Taft's support on a bill to establish a Child Labor Bureau.
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Parker reports on an interview with Morrison regarding Addams' opposition to a child actor exception to the 1903 Illinois Child Labor Law.
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Addams and a number of other leaders petition President Taft to open a commision to study the conditions of labor, its relation to the government, the cost of strikes, and trade unions.
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Addams praises Alexander McCormick for his experience and service to immigrants and supporting his candidacy for commissioner.
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In this speech given at the Auditorium Theater, under the auspices of the Hamilton Club, Addams argues for a system of international arbitration to avoid war.
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Addams argues before a Congressional Committee that women should have voting rights because their humanitarian voices are needed for the betterment of society.
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Addams offers a biographical justification of why she has entered politics and joined the Progressive Party. The article was published in October 1912.
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Lindsay provides names of potential members to work on a Federal Commission on Industrial Relations.
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Fisher invites Addams to a luncheon meeting in New York to discuss efforts to lobby for Progressive legislation.
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Addams writes Breckinridge that she is considering writing to Woodrow Wilson. This could be in regard to a petition that Addams and Breckinridge sent in April to the President, protesting racial segregation in the federal government.
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A circular sent to members of the National Council of Women to gather strength against a proposed Militia Pay Bill and increased militarism in the United States.
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The National Progressive Serivice suggests a draft constitution for state organizations, offering guidance for organization, administration and operations.
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The Progressive National Service reports on lobbying and legislative efforts undertaken between April 1 and May 15.
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Testimony of Addams and Anna Shaw before a Congressional Committee on Rules regarding woman's suffrage.
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Beveridge sends Addams a news clipping claiming that she is a traitor to the Progressive Party and later discusses plans to secure woman suffrage from the Wilson administration.

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