229 results

  • Tags: Legislation
REEL0006_0168.jpg

Davies sends Freund some data regarding factory inspector budgets, manpower, and numbers of inspections from 1893 to 1910.
REEL0006_0199.jpg

Lovejoy asks Addams about the status of the Child Actor Bill pending in the Illinois legislature.
REEL0006_0271.jpg

Lindsey apologizes to Owen for any distress following his statement at the Theatrical Benefit and discusses child labor and child actors.
REEL0006_0221.jpg

Davis telegrams Addams that the licensing system in place in Boston for newspaper boys does not appear to interfere with the business needs.
REEL0006_0230.jpg

Addams sends Johnson her letter to Niels Juul asking for another opportunity to address the Illinois Senate regarding Senate Substitute Bill 233 and child actors.
REEL0006_0231.jpg

Addams asks Juul if she can speak against a new version of Senate Bill 233 regarding child actors.
REEL0006_0234.jpg

Beck writes Addams to ask for the arguments she presented before the Illinois legislature regarding a bill to exempt child actors for the 1903 Illinois Child Labor Law.
REEL0006_0238.jpg

Holaday invites Addams to present her arguments on State Senate Bill 233, which threatens to exempt child actors from the 1903 Illinois Child Labor Law.
5158_001.jpg
Needs Review

Difficult

Bates writes Addams in support of her work to ban child actors from the theater.
REEL0006_0259.jpg

Donaghey writes Bowen about the scheduling of a new hearing to consider Senate Substitute Bill 233, regarding the exemption of child actors from the 1903 Illinois Child Labor Laws.
REEL 47_0195.jpg

Addams' testimony before an Illinois State Senate committee as the leader of a contingent to oppose legislation in Illinois that would exempt child actors from the state's 1903 Child Labor Law.
REEL0006_0273.jpg

Brown asks Addams for advice about how best to get his research on stage children to Illinois legislators.
REEL0006_0003.jpg
Not Started

Difficult

Addams writes Lovejoy about the progress of a bill in the Illinois legislature that would exempt child actors from the Illinois Child Labor Law.
REEL0006_0279.jpg

Brown offers Addams more information pertinent to the stage child investigation.
REEL0006_0287.jpg

Brown writes Addams about the revival of the stage child bill and about plans for a new pamphlet opposing it.
REEL0006_0288.jpg

Addams asks Oglesby to allow herself or someone else to testify before the Illinois Senate in regard to legislation that would give theaters an exception to employing children after hours.
REEL0006_0291.jpg

Brown informs Addams that the street trades bill she favored failed in the Illinois Senate, but the child stage bill she opposed also failed.
REEL0006_0294.jpg

Chute and Brown send Addams a telegram regarding the defeat of stage bill in the Illinois Senate.
REEL0006_0295.jpg

Oglesby informs Addams that allowing her request to speak at the hearings on the child actor bill was not within his power.
REEL0006_0298.jpg

Denvir informs Addams that the Illinois legislative bill, which would have allowed theaters to employ children after hours, failed in large part to her efforts against it.
REEL0006_0432.jpg

Lindsey writes Lathrop about a controversial child labor law, explaining his disagreement with Jane Addams over the issue.
REEL 47_0235.jpg

An excerpt from Addams' address to the National American Woman Suffrage Association, on October 21, 1911, in Louisville, Kentucky, arguing that the desire for woman suffrage comes from women's desires for better social conditions.
REEL 47_0237.jpg

Arguing that white slavery requires an organized movement to defeat it, Addams provides examples from cases in Chicago. This is the first in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil in 1912.
REEL0006_0532.jpg

After reading her McClure's Magazine article, Miller sends Addams newspaper clippings about a white slavery case that was successfuly prosecuted in Indiana.
REEL0006_0533.jpg

Mee offers a lawyer's perspective on Addams' white slavery article in McClure's Magazine and compliments her grasp of the legislation.