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  • Tags: Children
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Addams discusses the value of playgrounds for urban children, emphasizing the situation for youth in London.
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Addams' argues that child labor is the greatest social ill in remarks at the American Humane Association Convention on November 14, 1906. This version was published in December.
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Addams discusses the responsibility of the State for the public health and sanitation and child labor.
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Lindsey informs Addams that she has been appointed to a committee to establish International Juvenile Court Societies.
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Addams gave this speech at the first meeting of the Playground Association of America, held in Chicago, June 20, 1907. She spoke on the importance of play in the life of industrial and urban societies. The speech was published in August in Charities and the Commons.
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Addams' testimonial to the educational value of Carl Laemmle's movies, which are shown in Hull-House.
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Addams explores the lack of opportunities, education and home life that leads young women into trouble.
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Addams describes how boyish exuberance is stunted if there are no opportunities for play.
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Addams participated in a tribute dinner to Mary Augusta Ward, held by the Playground Association of America. The event was held on March 31, 1908, at New York's Waldorf Astoria Hotel, where Addams discussed the need for play, art, and creativity, and warns that without such outlets men will fall to drink and immoral behavior. She highlighted the lack of healthy entertainments, especially for young women. The speech was published in April in The Playground, a monthly journal of the Playground Association of America.
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Addams praises the new park established in Dayton and is drowned out by children's excitement.
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Speaking to the National Education Association meeting, Addams discusses her thoughts on educating mentally, morally or physically "deficient" children.
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Addams speaks to the Chicago Sinai congregation on the value of theater for moral teaching of the young.
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Addams writes Linn about a tea party she hosted.
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Addams advocates for public recreational spaces for the benefit of all.
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Bok congratulates Addams on her article "The Bad Boy of the Street" and tells her he wishes to publish it in two parts, but that it will require some editing.
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Murphy writes Addams to tell her that her new book is an inspiration to him and shares some of his own ideas about children and the treatment of African Americans in the North and South.
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Scudder praises Addams' latest book and applauds its tenderness, but she shares her own doubts about change, nonetheless.
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Addams congratulates Ewing on the birth of her daughter and sends Christmas wishes along with a copy of her new book, The Spirit of Youth and the City Streets.
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Louise deKoven Bowen presented the report of the Children's Committee of the National Conference on Charities and Correction for Jane Addams, discussing the lives of children in tenements and proposing more resources for recreation for them. The speech was given during a session on Children held on May 23.
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Addams and Marshall discuss play's positive effect on young children.
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Needs Review

Difficult

Addams writes Lathrop about the Juvenile Court and instructions about the fresh air program.
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Addams expresses her concern to La Follette that the After School Club is not a charity.
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Lindsey writes Lathrop for Jane Addams' opinions about the Boy Scouts of America.
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Addams writes Lindsey about the positive effects of the Boy Scouts.