195 results

  • Tags: African-Americans
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Addams' argues that mob violence, and particularly lynching against African Americans in the South, erodes respect for the all among all groups and accomplishes nothing positive for any community that condones it.
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Addams reports on events in New Orleans at the Methodist Missionary Conference, including attending a talk by Booker T. Washington. She also writes about changes in her travel plans and how she wishes that Smith was with her.
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Deknatel writes on Addams behalf, disputing an article which states that she is in favor of lynching African-Americans.
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Addams attends the Middle States and Mississippi Valley Negro Exposition and comments that in future the work of women will equal that of men.
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Ovington proposes establishing a settlement to work with African-Americans in New York and asks Addams' advice.
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Addams notes that she sent Haldeman a copy of Du Bois' "Souls of the Black Folk," and asks after Marcet's health.
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Addams notes a discussion in the news about creating segregated schools and is calling a meeting at Hull-House to discuss it.
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Du Bois invites Addams to speak for twenty minutes at the Tenth Annual Conference for the Study of the Negro Problems.
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Addams declines Du Bois invitation to the Atlanta Conference on Negro Problems due to a glut of commencement speeches on her schedule.
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A pamphlet listing Theophile T. Allain's credentials as a lecturer.
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Pinkett praises Addams' defense of immigrants in her article in Charities and Commons and relates the persecution of immigrants to that of African-Americans.
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Du Bois discusses arrangements for Addams' participation in the Conference for the Study of Negro Problems in Atlanta, Georgia.
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In this address given at the 13th Annual Conference for the Study of the Negro Problems held at Atlanta University, Addams discusses the difficulties immigrants face in Chicago.
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Addams is one of a number of people who sign a call for a conference to examine the situation of African-Americans since emancipation. Various versions of the call appeared in newspapers across the country.
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Article about the creation of a permanent committee, on which Jane Addams was invited to serve, coming out of the Conference on the Status of the Negro.
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Walling invites Addams to join the permanent committee created from the Conference on the Status of the Negro.
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Murphy writes Addams to tell her that her new book is an inspiration to him and shares some of his own ideas about children and the treatment of African Americans in the North and South.
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Addams writes about the strong racism asserting itself in America, blaming it on segregation and the lack of interaction between white and black people.
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Addams asks Blaine to assist Oswald Villard with the organization of Chicago efforts related to the Association of the Advancement of Colored People.
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Newspaper report of the lynching of six black men in Lake City, Florida, accused of murdering Robert B. Smith, a prominent white man.
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Flexner sends Addams his letter to Lillian Wald about the lynching in Livermore, Kentucky.
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Roosevelt compliments Addams's article in McClure's, which argues that woman's suffrage will lift up women from vice. But he also offers a caution that women's suffrage could fail to impart real change as suffrage failed to impart real change for African Americans in the South.
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Addams writes Crane about a misunderstanding in regard to the leadership of the National American Woman Suffrage Convention in Louisville, Kentucky.