66 results

  • Mentions: Chicago Juvenile Court
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Addams' draft notes for a eulogy for Alzina Parsons Stevens in which she quotes from William Wordsworth's "The Happy Warrior."
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With Maud Booth, Addams addresses the Merchant's Club, appealing for aid in helping criminals and rescuing boys who may become criminals.
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Addams addresses the Merchants Club of Chicago regarding the stealing and gambling habits of young, immigrant boys.
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A 28-page illustrated pamphlet outlining the work and social conditions of newsboys and newsgirls, based on a two-day intensive investigation. In it the Committee proposes revisions in child labor laws to curb the worst excesses.
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Addams discusses the experiences of Chicago probation officers and the profession of civil service.
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Addams discusses the value of playgrounds for urban children, emphasizing the situation for youth in London.
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Smith apologizes for Addams that she cannot be in Chicago when Lindsey's friend, Porter, will be visiting.
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Annual report of Hull-House, covering the activities, operations, and administration.
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Addams writes Haldeman expressing regrets that she is too busy to leave Chicago and promising to visit in the fall.
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Addams argues for the creation of entertainments for urban dwellers for recreation and relaxation.
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Addams explores the lack of opportunities, education and home life that leads young women into trouble.
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Addams co-wrote the Hull-House entry in The New Encyclopedia of Social Reform, covering its history and accomplishments.
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In this address, delivered for the Merrick Lectures, 1907-8, Addams describes the difficulty immigrant women face as they try to assimilate into American life.
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Addams discusses the work of the League for the Protection of Children, formed to advocate for the well being of children in Chicago. The comments were made during the National Education Association meeting.
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Speaking to the National Education Association meeting, Addams discusses her thoughts on educating mentally, morally or physically "deficient" children.
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In this address, given to the Annual Meeting of the National Education Association in 1908, Addams speaks of the importance of education within the immigrant community and the role of teachers as bridges between the families of students and American society.
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Addams argues women's need for the vote so that they can  perform their duties to family and the nation.
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Addams argues that young boys need an outlet for their pent-up energy and adventurousness, and that without an outlet, like a playground, they are susceptible to petty crime.
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Addams explains the relationship between education, religion, labor, and crime as she has experienced it in Chicago.
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Addams writes Kent about the playground situation in the neighborhood and teases him its his fault she is busy writing a series of articles for the American Magazine.
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Louise deKoven Bowen presented the report of the Children's Committee of the National Conference on Charities and Correction for Jane Addams, discussing the lives of children in tenements and proposing more resources for recreation for them. The speech was given during a session on Children held on May 23.
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Addams gave this lecture at least two times; once at the February 2 meeting of the New York City Women's Political Union, and again on February 14 at the Boston School Voters' League. In the lecture, she discusses the philosophical relationship between women and the State and argues for the value of women in government, leading to the importance of woman suffrage.
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In the final installment of "Why Women Should Vote," Addams highlights why women need the ballot and argues that woman suffrage is centuries overdue and necessary for women to protect themselves.
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Lindsey apologizes to Owen for any distress following his statement at the Theatrical Benefit and discusses child labor and child actors.
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Needs Review

Difficult

Addams writes Lathrop about the Juvenile Court and instructions about the fresh air program.
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Not Started

Difficult

Addams writes Lathrop about her living arrangements at Hull House.
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Not Started

Difficult

Addams updates Lathrop on her stay in Maine and offers advice on Lathrop's work with the Juvenile Court in Chicago.
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Lindsey writes Lathrop about a controversial child labor law, explaining his disagreement with Jane Addams over the issue.
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A draft of Addams' brief tribute to Louise DeKoven Bowen that was later published in the American Magazine.
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Addams' brief tribute to and biography of Louise DeKoven Bowen.
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