28 results

  • Subject is exactly "women's movement"
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Kellor tries to persuade Addams to hold a women's meeting in Boston next month.
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Addams details the many reasons why it is important that women be given the right to vote, and of how the suffrage movement is not just found in Western nations, but globally.
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Addams expresses why the time is now that women should be able to vote, with in regards to the social power women have which can be used for political power.
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Speech given by Addams at the Biennial Convention of the General Federation of Women's Clubs, concerning the role women's clubs has and can further have in shaping policies.
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A writing by Addams detailing the many reasons why it is important that women be given the right to vote, and of how the movement is not just found in Western nations, but globally.
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Speech given by Addams at the Biennial Convention of the General Federation of Women's Clubs, concerning the role of women's clubs in shaping public policies.
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Addams argues that American women are behind their European peers with regard to individual rights.
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Taylor explains the relationship among the British women's organizations and the reasons that she did not attend the conference at The Hague.
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Bok's questions for a series of interviews with Jane Addams and other prominent women are intended to find an explanation for women's "unrest" and the factors that have led to their discontent.
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Following up on a conversation with Addams, Sanville tells her about the situation women face in Pennsylvania and efforts to pass legislation protecting them from long work hours.
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Pennybacker informs Addams that her letter was received, and that she wishes to attend a second meting in Washington. She goes on to express concern regarding the effectiveness of the actions the Federation takes.
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Sewall reports on her activities and fears that she will not be able to make the Washington planning meeting.
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Difficult

Catt supports Addams' plan for a peace conference and makes suggestions.
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Addams discusses plans for gathering a group of women peace activists to work on a resolution or proposal. (Enclosures not found.)
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Bok asks Addams for an article arguing against the idea that women over fifty should give up social service and civic work.
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A circular to announce the establishment of and solicit contributions for the Women's Special Shilling Fund to provide shelter to working women.
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The Stead International Memorial Fund describes its plan for establishing "The Stead Hostels" around England, which will provide housing for working women.
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Marshall asks Addams for permission to use her name in support of women's hostel to be founded by the Stead International Memorial Fund.
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Addams warns independent women against men who will try to take advantage of them in matters of money. This column appeared with slight variations in a number of newspapers between 1907-1910.
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Thomas asks Johnson to collect as much money as possible for the Woman's Journal and sends copies of the letter to Jane Addams and Sophonisba Breckinridge.
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La Follette writes Dennett about her reasoning for going off the board of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, recommends a successor, and shares some political opinions.
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An anonymous correspondent accuses Addams of being a "dupe" to Theodore Roosevelt.
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Article describing the events of the women's meeting at the International Peace Congress in Boston that includes portions of speeches by Lucia Ames Mead, Mrs. W. P. Byles, Jane Addams, and Miss M. E. Dunhill.
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Addams writes Green expressing her delight to correspond with a man who had been in communication with the great leaders of the women's movement.
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Sigsbee compliments Addams on her article in American Magazine and comments on the relationship between poverty and crime.
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Coman praises Twenty Years at Hull-House and declares that Addams' writing is demonstrative of the potential of American women.
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Charles K. Gibson's poem argues for women's rights and public activities.
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