64 results

  • Subject is exactly "suffrage movement"
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In terms of securing their rights, Addams argues that women in America lag behind their European counterparts.
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Addams discusses the movement for municipal suffrage for women in Chicago, arguing that it will help improve schools, public health, and sanitation.
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Addams writes James about plans for a suffrage meeting in Milwaukee.
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Bok's questions for a series of interviews with Jane Addams and other prominent women are intended to find an explanation for women's "unrest" and the factors that have led to their discontent.
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An excerpt from Addams' address to the National American Woman Suffrage Association, on October 21, 1911, in Louisville, Kentucky, arguing that the desire for woman suffrage comes from women's desires for better social conditions.
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Addams argues that woman suffrage is long overdue.
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In this first installment of "Why Women Should Vote," Addams argues that antiquated notions of being a "lady" work against the woman suffrage movement.
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Addams writes Crane about a misunderstanding in regard to the leadership of the National American Woman Suffrage Convention in Louisville, Kentucky.
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Addams argues for women to have the vote in order that they may continue to perform their duties to family and to home in the modern world, where responsibilities, like feeding their children and keeping them safe, are no long directly within their…
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A newspaper report and excerpts from Addams' February 17 speech at the National Suffrage Convention, after the defeat of municipal suffrage for women in Chicago.
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Addams reports that when Lindsey was not nominated for re-election by either party, the women of Denver elected him as an independent.
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Lindsey writes Addams that Theodore Roosevelt and the Progressive Party platform will stand for woman suffrage.
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Addams discusses a telegram sent by Millicent Garrett Fawcett to Theodore Roosevelt endorsing his candidacy, plans to publicize the endorsement and Addams's articles on Progressivism.
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Gordon refuses Addams' request to help the Progressive Party, because she believes Theodore Roosevelt in not genuine in his support of woman suffrage.
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Addams argues women's need for the vote so that they can perform their duties to family and the nation.
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Hooker asks advice on whether the Suffrage League of Maryland should support the new Progressive Party or the Democratic Party, which is so strong in the state.
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Macmillan asks Addams for a picture to accompany an article on Addams and the suffrage movement in theCincinnati Enquirer.
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Atchison congratulates Addams for seconding the nomination of Theodore Roosevelt at the Progressive Party Convention and expresses her enthusiasm for the party's support of woman suffrage.
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McClure asks Addams for permission to reprint "The Modern City and Municipal Franchise for Women" in McClure's Magazine.
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Ketcham writes to Addams about his support for Theodore Roosevelt and cautions about the danger of the Catholic Church against him.
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Shaw informs board members of the National American Woman Suffrage Association about the organization's fundraising issues.
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Shaw writes to Addams to clarify the awkward situation between the National and State associations for suffrage in navigating the Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft campaigns.
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Fawcett congratulates Roosevelt on his support for woman suffrage.
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Porter commends Addams' role with the Progressive Party and invites her to speak in California.
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Nordyke congratulates Addams' on her defense of her decision to support the Progressive Party.
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Hubbard writes Addams about his ideas on woman suffrage, arguing that a husband should be allowed to cast two votes, one for himself and one for his wife, if his wife so chooses.
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McCarthy chastises Addams for supporting Theodore Roosevelt whom he says is a dishonorable, political opportunist.
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Kent asks Addams to campaign for suffrage in states like California, where women already have the vote and to assist him with his reelection.
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Graham questions Addams' support of the Progressive Party, arguing that the Prohibition Party has included woman suffrage on it's platform for decades.
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The article covers the founding the Woman's National Wilson and Marshall Organization and the efforts for clean government, especially in states like New Jersey.
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