12 results

  • Subject is exactly "social purity"
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Nelson compliments Addams' article in McClure's Magazine and encloses a donation to help suppress prostitution.
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Welsh praises Addams' article on white slavery in McClure's Magazine and hopes it will start a discussion on the topic.
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Bowerman congratulates Addams for tackling the difficult issue of white slavery in her series in McClure's Magazine, and he asks for her advice about literature librarians could provide to patrons to educate without offending them.
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Arguing that white slavery requires an organized movement to defeat it, Addams provides examples from cases in Chicago. This is the first in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil in 1912.
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Writing in response to Addams' article on prostitution, Sheldon asks her why the temptations of vice do not doom all girls in similar situations.
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Corn offers Addams his argument for the sterilization of sex offenders as the only way to curb vice and prostitution.
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Page proofs of "Chapter V: Social Control," the final article in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil later in the year.
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Addams discusses how social movements can help alleviate vice, providing examples such as crusades against diseases and organized opposition to the white slave trade. This is the final article in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil later in the year.
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Manny praises Addams for her new book and discusses issues in Baltimore.
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Addams and other members of the American Vigilance Association resign so that the organization's headquarters can relocate to New York.
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Addams exposes the double standard applied to women who break society's moral codes and argues for a more charitable view of women and a better understanding of their economic circumstances. A version of this was published in November 1913.
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Addams exposes the double standard applied to women who break society's moral codes and argues for a more charitable view of women and a better understanding of their economic circumstances. This is the eleventh article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and a woman's role to affect change.
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