52 results

  • Subject is exactly "immigration reform"
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Addams tells Lewis about Jeannette Rankin's interest in working with Women's International League for Peace and Freedom.
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Addams advises Doty about holding the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom's United States Section's meeting in Chicago, and discusses Japanese-American relations.
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Addams provides Straus with information on the Committee on Immigrants program coming up at the Conference of Charities and Correction.
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Addams sends Kellogg a letter from Countess Treuberg regarding possible publication in the Survey.
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Addams sends a statement to the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom that includes her telegram to Calvin Coolidge regarding the pending immigration law.
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Addams expresses praise to the President for vetoing an immigration bill.
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Addams, Bowen, and Breckinridge invite an unknown person to Hull-House for a meeting of professors and the League for the Protection of Immigrants.
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Berwald takes issue with the Tribune's stance that only true Americans have ancestors who spoke English. He also expresses his anti-war beliefs.
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Rosenwald asks Addams for the Progressive leaders to offer statements on literacy tests for immigrants.
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Addams notes that American foreign policy is criticized outside the country for failing to join the World Court and League of Nations.
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Smith thanks Kohn for the candies she sent to her and to Jane Addams aboard ship for their journey to Egypt and offers some details of their sea voyage.
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Addams offers a counter narrative to the idea that the U.S. government should limit immigration, arguing that immigrants provide benefits to society and are deserving of protections under the law. This is the fifth article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and a woman's role to affect change.
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Draft program Addams sends to David Bressler for the Conference of Charities and Correction.
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Addams provides an argument against literacy tests for immigrants, proposed by the Burnett Bill recently pased by the U.S. House of Representatives.
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Addams delivered this commencement address at the University of Chicago on December 20, 1904, the first woman to be a commencement speaker at the college.
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Gulick tells Addams about the efforts of the Committee in regard to the House Immigration Bill and seeks financial support.
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Gulick asks Addams' advice on how the National Committee on American Japanese Relations can best combat the quota being placed on Japanese immigrants.
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Gulick sends Addams a new statement of policy (not found) which the National Committee on American Japanese Relations had to alter in light of the new immigration law.
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Addams offers a counter narrative to the idea that the U.S. government should limit immigration, arguing that immigrants provide benefits to society and are deserving of protections under the law.
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In this address, given to the Annual Meeting of the National Education Association in 1908, Addams speaks of the importance of education within the immigrant community and the role of teachers as bridges between the families of students and American society.
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McClatchy asks Addams to oppose efforts to weaken immigration restrictions on Japan and to help them obtain more supporters among the clergy.
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McClatchy tells Gulick that the California Joint Immigration Committee will oppose the Wickersham plan to open visas for Japan in 1927.
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Addams urges the public to have a better understanding of the immigrant so as to benefit from their often unseen wisdom and culture.