36 results

  • Subject is exactly "criminal justice"
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Addams weighs in on the sentencing of Louis Satt, the brother of a Hull-House student.
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At the inaugural meeting of the National Juvenile Protection Association held at Hull-House, Addams argues that the police should become educated about the needs of children.
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Addams chastises newspapers for glamorizing the story of Harry Thaw, an heir to a railroad fortune who killed his wife's lover.
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Newspaper report of the lynching of six black men in Lake City, Florida, accused of murdering Robert B. Smith, a prominent white man.
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Arguing that white slavery requires an organized movement to defeat it, Addams provides examples from cases in Chicago. This is the first in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published asA New Conscience and an Ancient Evilin 1912.
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Addams gave this lecture at least two times; once at the February 2 meeting of the New York City Women's Political Union, and again on February 14 at the Boston School Voters' League. In the lecture, she discusses the philosophical relationship…
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Addams talks about the settlement as a bulwark against anti-immigrant persecution, using examples of Russian anarchists.
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Addams warns independent women against men who will try to take advantage of them in matters of money. This is a reprint of an article first published in 1907.
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With Maud Booth, Addams addresses the Merchant's Club, appealing for aid in helping criminals and rescuing boys who may become criminals.
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Addams describes how boyish exuberance is stunted if there are no opportunities for play.
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Addams explores the lack of opportunities, education and home life that leads young women into trouble.
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For a pamphlet published by the Peace Association of Friends, Addams argues against having rifle practice in public schools.
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Addams explains the relationship between education, religion, labor, and crime as she has experienced it in Chicago.
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Jesse Ashley's article describing a strike in Massachusetts.
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Henderson offers an analysis of Addams' statement about capital punishment in Illinois.
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Stuart tells Addams about a court case in which he defended George Weber.
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Laidlaw writes to Waldo about an brutal attack on a female social worker in New York City's Chinatown and demands an investigation.
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The Woman Suffrage Party demands that the New York Police protect social workers in Chinatown.
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Rockefeller thanks Addams for her support of the idea about which he wrote her and accepts her offer to send him a copy of her book, probablyA New Conscience and an Ancient Evil.
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Rockefeller seeks Addams' opinion on a plan of Katherine Davis to create a "Criminalistic Institute," an evaluation program for women accused of crime.
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Lyman writes Addams to share her ideas about hiring police women to monitor rooming houses and theaters to ensure the safety of vulnerable young women.
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Speranza's assignments of Committee on Crime and Immigration members into subcommittees.
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The author sympathizes with the McNamara brothers, who bombed the Los Angeles Times building in California in October 1910, because they were insane but criticizes the Chicago newspapers for responding with bigotry against the Irish community.
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Speranza thanks Abbott and Jane Addams for their work on behalf of the American Institute of Criminal Law & Criminology in its investigation of the courts.
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Welcome, a prisoner in the Illinois State Penitentiary, asks Addams for advice regarding getting parole and asks her to assure his mother that he doing fine.
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McClure explains the publication of an article by William J. Burns in McClure's Magazine about the 1910 Los Angeles Times bombing case to Addams, because it caused her some embarrassment.
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Flexner describes a lynching in Livermore, Kentucky and the reaction of the town and arrest of the participants.
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Abbott writes Speranza with Jane Addams' opinion that the North American Civic League should conduct an investigation into crime and immigration in New York.
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Speranza complains to MacChesney that his committee has been unable to do much on their research on immigrants and crime.
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Greeley praises Addams' article on the Averbuch Incident and discusses his sojourn in Maine.
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