27 results

  • Subject is exactly "civil liberties"
36213.jpg

Bailey tells Addams that the American Civil Liberties Union will sue C. B. Hopkins for libel.
JAPM-18-0218.jpeg

Bailey tells Addams that the American Civil Liberties Union plans to sue the Chicago Tribune, C. B. Hopkins and the Military Intelligence Association for libel. They want Addams to join the suit.
30008.JPG

Addams tells Pinchot that she will send his letter to the American Civil Liberties Union to answer his questions about clemency.
29604-01.JPG

Pinchot tells Addams that he cannot pardon prisoners under Pennsylvania law and advises that the American Civil Liberties Union follow the procedures.
1403-01.JPG

The Chicago branch of the Woman's Peace Party suggests that pacifists work on food conservation, child welfare, better conditions for soldiers, a defense of civil rights and plans for financing the war.
21655.jpg

De Silver asks Addams whether the American Civil Liberties Union can use her name in an advertisement regarding the trial of International Workers of the World leaders on espionage and sedition.
21593.jpg

De Silver asks American Civil Liberties Union members to allow the use of their names in an advertisement regarding the International Workers of the World free speech case.
20762-1.jpg

American Civil Liberties Union defines its stance on first amendment rights, labor rights, law enforcement, immigration and racial equality.
20761-01.jpg

A form asking for potential members for the American Civil Liberties Union.
REEL0012_1261.jpg

Kellogg sends Addams a Lyman Gage article that he thinks she may find useful.
REEL0012_1205.jpg

Addams tells Wood that she will join the Civil Liberties Bureau, but questions whether national groups are as effective as local ones.
REEL0012_1324.jpg

The American Civil Liberties Union seeks approval of its statement of principles and the candidacy of Fremont Older to the National Committee.
REEL0011_0832.jpg

A list of names of people likely to join the national committee of the Liberty Defense Union.
REEL0011_1190.jpg

Addams telegrams the National Civil Liberties Bureau that she cannot attend the Washington meeting.
REEL0011_1017.jpg

Addams offers comments on Roger Baldwin's statement regarding the Industrial Workers of the World Defense Committee.
REEL0011_1016.jpg

Addams tells Baldwin that there is not enough evidence with regard to the Industrial Workers of the World Defense Committee for her to contact the President.
REEL0010_0423.jpg

Kellogg introduces Addams to Stephen A. Chandler.
JAPA-0454.jpg

Addams is one of a number of people who sign a call for a conference to examine the situation of African-Americans since emancipation. Various versions of the call appeared in newspapers across the country.
REEL 47_0788.jpg

Addams offers a counter narrative to the idea that the U.S. government should limit immigration, arguing that immigrants provide benefits to society and are deserving of protections under the law. This is the fifth article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and a woman's role to affect change.
REEL 47_0781.jpg

Addams chastises American society for failing to live up to the ideals of the Emancipation Proclamation and demands political equality for black Americans.
REEL 47_0777.jpg

Addams chastises American society for failing to live up to the ideals of the Emancipation Proclamation and demands political equality for black Americans.
REEL 47_0757.jpg

Addams offers a counter narrative to the idea that the U.S. government should limit immigration, arguing that immigrants provide benefits to society and are deserving of protections under the law.
McClures-Nov1912-1.jpg

Addams describes her experiences at the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and its appeal to labor and women.
REEL 47_0525.jpg

Addams reports on the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and her dismay about the conventions unjust treatment of African-Americans. This is one of a series of articles she prepared as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.