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  • Subject is exactly "children"

Addams speaks before the Advertisers' Club of an incident that happened at Hull-House.
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Addams argues that the improvement of education for children starts with the improvement of their work conditions and environment and that a national effort is necessary so that every child is protected.

Havens, a delegate to the Progressive Convention in Chicago, praises Addams for her work and shares his great respect for her.

Addams testifies that the system of child labor destroys genius, and how work on the stage damages children.

Johnson writes Addams about land for sale on which to develop a camp for boys.
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Addams extols the benefits of cultivating a belief in Santa Claus among children. It was part of a larger article, "We Believe in Santa Claus," published in a variety of newspapers.
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Addams' brief opening address at the Chicago Child Welfare Exhibit.
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Speaking to the National Education Association meeting, Addams discusses her thoughts on educating mentally, morally or physically "deficient" children.
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Addams describes how boyish exuberance is stunted if there are no opportunities for play.
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Addams' testimonial to the educational value of Carl Laemmle's movies, which are shown in Hull-House.
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Addams gave this speech at the first meeting of the Playground Association of America, held in Chicago, June 20, 1907. She spoke on the importance of play in the life of industrial and urban societies. The speech was published in August in Charities…

Metcalfe writes Addams about his thoughts on sex education and pamphlets he uses in his work.

Livingston writes Addams about her article on white slavery, because she herself is working in the Chinatown area of New York City working to help women get out of prostitution.
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Draft of Addams' eulogy for Gordon Dewey, who died at eight years of age.
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Addams discusses the role of education in the lives of working class children. This is an excerpt from her book Democracy and Social Ethics.

An unsigned letter discusses farm property in the Evanston area for sale and suggests that it could serve Hull-House as a camp or summer location.
Needs Review


Addams writes Lathrop about the Juvenile Court and instructions about the fresh air program.
Not Started


Scudder praises Addams' latest book and applauds its tenderness, but she shares her own doubts about change, nonetheless.

Wheeler writes Addams about her article on recreation for young girls in cities and expresses his desire to introduce her to his wife and sister when she next visits New York.

Addams writes to Harper about the Children's Aid Society in Chicago and Harper's desire to help children.

Addams' eulogy Gordon Dewey, who died at eight years of age.
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Addams' draft speech, on child labor and education, given at the National Conference of Charities and Correction, in Indianapolis.

Addams writes to Hulbert congratulating him and her niece, Esther, on the birth of their daughter.
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Addams addresses the Merchants Club of Chicago regarding the stealing and gambling habits of young, immigrant boys.

Addams again asks Haldeman for an agreement in regard to Stanley Linn's property, she reports on visiting Esther Hulbert's new baby, she and promises to sent James Weber Linn's book.
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