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  • Subject is exactly "Chicago, political activities in"
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Addams discusses how philanthropic activities become political activities, citing instances from her own work in Chicago.
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Addams discusses how philanthropic activities become political activities, citing instances from her own work in Chicago.
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Addams discusses the movement for municipal suffrage for women in Chicago, arguing that it will help improve schools, public health, and sanitation.
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Addams advocates for public recreational spaces for the benefit of all.
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Ford encloses a number of clippings related to a Peace Song Service held two days prior.
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Addams talks about the settlement as a bulwark against anti-immigrant persecution, using examples of Russian anarchists.
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Mecartney asks Addams to tell him when Rosika Schwimmer arrives in Chicago so he can make the travel arrangements for her speech that evening.
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Merriam sends Addams a copy of an ordinance to create a Department of Public Welfare in Chicago and invites her to join a conference on it.
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Torbet reports to Addams the number of women judges and clerks in each ward.
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Addams argues for women to have the vote in order that they may continue to perform their duties to family and to home in the modern world, where responsibilities, like feeding their children and keeping them safe, are no long directly within their control.
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Addams spoke at a memorial meeting for Iroquois Theater fire victims, organized by the Chicago Teacher's Federation, about the dangers of overlooking violations in fear of being seen as bad people.
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A newspaper report and excerpts from Addams' February 17 speech at the National Suffrage Convention, after the defeat of municipal suffrage for women in Chicago.
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Robins informs Addams of his intention to endorse Alexander McCormick on the county ticket and expresses his hope that she will to write some articles to help the campaign.
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Announcement for Jane Addams' speech for the Progressive Party in Chicago.
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Robins reports on Progressive Party activities in Illinois from October 10 to 17.
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Robins discusses the success of a Progressive Party's Chicago store in spreading literature to the public and encourages the establishment of such stores in other cities as well as the formation of branches of the Jane Addams Chorus.
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Plummer assumes that Sippy is a Progressive and asks her to speak to other women about the Progressive Party.
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Plummer asks Henderson to join the Progressive Party and make a speech to Chicago women on why they should join as well.
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Addams testifies on the lack of statistics available to adequately analyze the welfare of children in Chicago and argues that a bureau could collect and disseminate such data.
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B. F. writes in praise of Addams' article "The Chicago Settlements and Social Unrest" in Charity and the Commons, discussing the role of the settlement in integrating immigrants into city life.
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An anonymous writer apologizes for his misunderstanding of the biases of the Record-Herald against the police. Addams received a copy of this letter.
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Addams received a copy of this anonymous letter, offering a scathing impression of Chicago politicians out to get Police Chief John McWeeny and criticizing the Chicago Tribune as corrupt. The writer uses derogatory names, like "Sneaky" and "Sissy," for many of the characters and calls the press the "Scrofulas."
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Addams writes Smith about a meeting of the Woman's Club and Chicago Garment Workers' Strike.
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Addams writes Smith, criticizing her own work after the publishing of Twenty Years at Hull House, and reporting news about her health and Chicago Garment Workers' Strike.