24 results

  • Subject is exactly "African-Americans, discrimination against"
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Addams is one of a number of people who sign a call for a conference to examine the situation of African-Americans since emancipation. Various versions of the call appeared in newspapers across the country.
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Addams explains her support for African-American delegates at the the Progressive Party Convention in Chicago. This is one of a series of articles she prepared as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
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Addams explains her support of African-American delegates at the the Progressive Party Convention in Chicago. This article, which appeared in The Crisis,was one of a series of articles she prepared for the election of 1912.
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Addams reports on the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and her dismay about the conventions unjust treatment of African-Americans. This is one of a series of…
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Addams writes about the strong racism asserting itself in America, blaming it on segregation and the lack of interaction between white and black people.

Lee thanks Addams for her statement in the article Has "Has Emancipation Been Nullified," and praises Abraham Lincoln, and discusses slavery and the virtues of liberty.

Jones reacts to an article that Addams sent him on the Progressive Party, focusing on her statements about African Americans and the peace movement.

The article offers a sharp critique of Theodore Roosevelt and the Progressive Party for failing to endorse rights for African Americans.

Walker writes Bill to resign from the 23rd Assembly District Progressive Club, citing Theodore Roosevelt's denial of full rights to African-Americans in the South as sinful and shameful.
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Woolley thanks Addams for sending an article and discusses her views on Theodore Roosevelt.

Woods congratulates Addams on her role at the Progressive Party Convention and offers his opinion on the situation of African-Americans and why he feels Theodore Roosevelt has a good solution for their problems.
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Williams sarcastically wallops Addams for backing Roosevelt, whom he calls the "Coward of San Juan."
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The editorial slams Theodore Roosevelt for drawing a color line in the Progressive Party.
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Allen writes Addams about his disappoint with Theodore Roosevelt and with the Progressive Party for their views on African Americans.

Jones asks Addams about Roosevelt's views on African Americans.

Pearl writes Addams for advice about starting a settlement house for African Americans.

Flexner describes a lynching in Livermore, Kentucky and the reaction of the town and arrest of the participants.

Flexner sends Addams his letter to Lillian Wald about the lynching in Livermore, Kentucky.
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Villard asks Addams to protest the lynchings of six black men in Florida.

Murphy writes Addams to tell her that her new book is an inspiration to him and shares some of his own ideas about children and the treatment of African Americans in the North and South.

Article about the creation of a permanent committee, on which Jane Addams was invited to serve, coming out of the Conference on the Status of the Negro.

Pinkett praises Addams' defense of immigrants in her article in Charities and Commons andrelates the persecution of immigrants to that of African-Americans.

Addams' argues that mob violence, and particularly lynching against African Americans in the South, erodes respect for the all among all groups and accomplishes nothing positive for any community that condones it.

Ovington proposes establishing a settlement to work with African-Americans in New York and asks Addams' advice.
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