48 results

  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, views on war"
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Newspaper excerpt of Addams' speech at the Ethical Culture Society, criticizing the buildup of armaments.
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Addams suggests sending peacemakers rather than warships to Turkey.
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Addams suggests sending peacemakers rather than warships to Turkey.
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Addams offers a substitute for war involving guidance rather than violence.
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Addams argues that if the rulers of European countries lived among their people, they would see that labor and commerce were what made nations, not its military might.
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Addams offers arguments for decrease in war and bellicose behavior. The article was printed in multiple newspapers.
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Addams publishes the first chapter of Newer Ideals of Peace, in Charities and the Commons, arguing for a new approach to peace propaganda. She makes a direct appeal to sentiments and opinions to oppose the exploitation of the weak and to reject of blind militarism.
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Addams' speech to the first National Arbitration and Peace Congress of America, given in New York at an evening session at Carnegie Hall. Addams discusses a rejection of warfare and military might as the only means to display patriotism, suggesting instead that people look for examples in industrial progress. The speech was published in the Congress Proceedings.
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Addams' speech to the first National Arbitration and Peace Congress of America, given in New York at an evening session at Carnegie Hall. Addams discusses a rejection of warfare and military might as the only means to display patriotism, suggesting instead that people look for examples in industrial progress. The speech was published in the Congress Proceedings, and later edited by hand.
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Stenographic transcription of Addams' speech to the National Arbitration and Peace Congress in New York City. Addams discusses a rejection of warfare and military might as the only way of displaying patriotism, suggesting instead that we seek examples in industrial progress.
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Addams' second speech at the National Arbitration and Peace Congress, given at the University Session. The speech discusses changes in society that make the ground fruitful for peace movements. The speech was published in the conference proceedings.
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A stenographic transcription of Addams' second speech at the National Arbitration and Peace Congress, given at the University Session in which she argues that the moment for peace activism is here and can best be led from America.
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Newspaper report of a leaflet Addams and others produced in opposition to the enlargement of the U.S. Navy.
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Addams is one of the signers of a leaflet, arguing against the enlargement of the U.S. Navy. Shortened versions of this leaflet were also published in newspapers.
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Addams reports on the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and her dismay about the conventions unjust treatment of African-Americans. This is one of a series of articles she prepared as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
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In a humorous effort to render the male arguments against woman suffrage absurd, Addams describes a hypothetical world in which women hold power and men are asking for the vote.
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In a humorous effort to render the male arguments against woman suffrage absurd, Addams describes a hypothetical world in which women hold power and men are asking for the vote. This is the sixth article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and women's roles affecting change.
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Addams, comparing the act of human sacrifice to what is going on in the early stages of World War One, points out how pointless both acts are.
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A writing by Addams detailing the many reasons why it is important that women be given the right to vote, and of how the movement is not just found in Western nations, but globally.
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Addams argues that international peace is not a failed idea, and even though World War I is in the early stages of fighting it is not too late to stop war from continuing.
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Passages taken from Addams book "Newer Ideas of Peace," in which she argues against war on the grounds that it is something that is beneath the ideas of modern man, something not to be admired, and a waste of time and energy.
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Addams argues that international peace is not a failed idea, and even though World War One is in the early stages of fighting it is not to late to stop war from continuing. Bryan also claims that peace is possible with mediation.
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Addams urges the belligerent nations at war to call a ceasefire in honor of Christmas.
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Addams gave this speech at the Woman's Constructive Peace Conference in Washington, D.C., on the reasons why women need to become more active in politics and the peace movement.
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Addams discusses women's roles during war at Smith College.
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Addams discussed the impact of war on women in a morning talk at the Cort Theater in New York.
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Addams denounces the newly formed American Legion as a project that could lead the United States into war and argues for conscious efforts to spread peace. The speech was made at the Cort Theater to the Woman's Peace Party on March 5.
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Addams urges for citizens of neutral nations to work actively for peace.
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Addams, Kellogg, and Wald argue the many reasons why World War One is destroying society, and detail how it is robbing a generation of its people and future. They also argue that the global community has the power to stop this war and prevent other wars.
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Addams' speech at the Free Synagogue at Carnegie Hall discusses the setbacks that World War I will have on society.
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