129 results

  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, views on peace"
WomansPeaceMeeting-page-002.jpg

Article describing the events of the women's meeting at the International Peace Congress in Boston that includes portions of speeches by Lucia Ames Mead, Mrs. W. P. Byles, Jane Addams, and Miss M. E. Dunhill.
REEL 47_1256.jpg

Addams discusses the devastating impact of World War I on women's traditional responsibilities.
REEL 47_1254.jpg

Addams discusses the devastating impact of World War I on women's traditional responsibilities and argues for their responsibility to stop it.
REEL 47_1172.jpg

Addams announces a public meeting in Amsterdam during which leaders of the International Congress of Women will discuss , noting public support for peace.
REEL 47_1170.jpg

One of Addams' cabled reports to the New York Times, relaying events at the International Congress of Women.
REEL 46_1746.jpg

Addams argues that it is time for women to work in groups and advocate for causes that are important to them, like peace. Addams gave this address at the National Peace Congress in Chicago. This version was published in the proceedings.
REEL0048_0544.jpg

Addams argues that the League of Nations could increase its popularity by taking on European relief efforts.
REEL 47_1176.jpg

Addams and Lochner retell the events of the International Congress of Women.
REEL 47_1181.jpg

Addams and Lochner, retell the events of the International Congress of Women.
10007-new-1.JPG

An interview with Addams, by Marshall, right before she leaves for the The Hague peace conference. In this interview Addams discusses the importance of the conference and of women's peace movements.
JAPA-0998.jpg
Not Started

Easy

Addams discusses neutrality and why women were best suited to protest against war at Radcliffe College.
REEL0011_1118.jpg

Weyl thanks Addams for her critique of his book The End of War (1918).
REEL 47_1127.jpg

Addams, Kellogg, and Wald argue the many reasons why World War One is destroying society, and detail how it is robbing a generation of its people and future. They also argue that the global community has the power to stop this war and prevent other wars.
JAPA-0951.jpg

Addams calls for the public to join the peace movement, demonstrate public sentiment for peace, and attend a conference.
JAPA-0452-01.jpg

Addams is one of the signers of a leaflet, arguing against the enlargement of the U.S. Navy. Shortened versions of this leaflet were also published in newspapers.
JAPA-1567.jpg

Addams, speaking at Schenley High School, described the differing motivations of the wealthy and the poor when it comes to disarmament.
REEL 47_1220.jpg

A published version of Addams's Carnegie Hall speech, held July 9, on her return from Europe. In it Adams detailed the work of the International Congress of Women and her ideas on peace.
REEL 46_1234.jpg

Addams discussed women's role in the peace movement at the Universal Peace Conference in Boston.
REEL0048_0418.jpg

Addams spoke to the Academy of Political and Social Science in support of the League of Nations and its mandate system. Her talk was part of a group of papers on the Treatment of Backwards Peoples in a World Organization, and a sub-topic of The System of Mandates and the Obligations of Mandatories in the Existing League of Nations.
REEL0048_0406.jpg

Addams spoke to the Academy of Political and Social Science in support of the League of Nations and its mandate system. Her talk was part of a group of papers on the Treatment of Backwards Peoples in a World Organization, and a sub-topic of The System of Mandates and the Obligations of Mandatories in the Existing League of Nations.
REEL 47_1835.jpg

Addams argues for post war relief and the establishment of the League of Nations and other international organizations to help guarantee the peace. The speech was given at the University Auditorium as part of the Farmer's Week celebration.
REEL 46_1585.jpg

A stenographic transcription of Addams' second speech at the National Arbitration and Peace Congress, given at the University Session in which she argues that the moment for peace activism is here and can best be led from America.
REEL 46_1518.jpg

Addams' second speech at the National Arbitration and Peace Congress, given at the University Session. The speech discusses changes in society that make the ground fruitful for peace movements. The speech was published in the conference proceedings.
REEL 46_1224.jpg

Addams participated in a "Workingman's Public Meeting" during the Universal Peace Conference in Boston, where she talked about how workingmen were the first to organize internationally.
REEL 47_1281.jpg

Addams writes about the activities for peace that she and other members of the International Congress of Women have accomplished.
REEL 47_0745.jpg

In a humorous effort to render the male arguments against woman suffrage absurd, Addams describes a hypothetical world in which women hold power and men are asking for the vote.
JAPA-0984.jpg

An excerpt from Addams' Children's Day speech at the Free Synagogue at Carnegie Hall.
REEL0048_0443.jpg

Addams provides reasons for disarmament as a means to better the economy, reduce unemployment and taxes, and improve international relations. The speech was given at the Eccleston Guildhouse in London and then published.
REEL 47_1292.jpg

Addams, Lucy Mead, Crystal Eastman, and Sophonisba Breckinridge testify before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, on preparedness and the United States' role in World War I.
REEL 47_1324.jpg

Addams, Lucia Mead, Crystal Eastman, and Sophonisba Breckinridge testify before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, arguing against preparedness and suggesting ways to end the war.
Output Formats

atom, dc-rdf, dcmes-xml, json, omeka-xml, rss2