49 results

  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, views on labor"
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Addams seeks Washington's aid in a campaign for labor regulations.
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Newspaper report of an Addams' statement about the causes of violent labor actions being antiquated laws.
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In a speech at Carnegie Music Hall, Addams discusses immigrants to America and the work ethic of Chicago immigrants.
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Addams discusses the economic, social, and human toll of unemployment and offers some creative solutions to the problem being employed in England. This is the ninth article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and women's roles in affecting change.
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Addams discusses the economic, social, and human toll of unemployment and suggests some creative solutions being employed in England.
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Addams argues for a minimum wage for female workers. This is the third article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and women's role in affecting change.
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Addams describes her experiences at the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and its appeal to labor and women.
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Addams discusses the labor situation in Chicago and argues that the Progressive Party will support the work of trade unions.
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Addams discusses working conditions for women and advocates for a minimum wage for female workers.
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Addams argues for the implementation of a minimum wage for female workers.
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Addams reports on the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and her dismay about the conventions unjust treatment of African-Americans. This is one of a series of articles she prepared as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
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Addams discusses the labor situation in Chicago and argues that the Progressive Party will support the work of trade unions. This is one of a series of articles she prepared for the Central Press Association as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
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Addams explores the economic plight of young women that often drives them to prostitution and white slavery. This is the second in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil in 1912.
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Addams' lecture on March 12 at the National Child Labor Committee Conference in Birmingham, Alabama, in which she discusses child labor legislation in Illinois.
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Addams' lecture on March 11 at the National Child Labor Committee Conference in Birmingham, Alabama, in which she presents arguments against an exception to the 1903 Illinois Child Labor Law for child actors and offers some Tolstoyan allegory to buttress her arguments.
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Addams led a contingent to oppose efforts to exclude child actors from child labor laws. She testified before the State Senate committee considering the bill, along with Will J. Davis (speaking for the bill), Mrs. Coonley-Ward, Mrs. A. T. Aldrich, Margaret Halsey, and Anna Nichols.
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In this narratively rich article in McClure's, Addams reflects on her meeting with Tolstoy in Russia in 1896, on her admiration for his principles, and on her pragmatic approach to good work in the urban, industrial context of Hull-House and its diverse surroundings.
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In this speech at the National Conference of Charities and Correction in Boston, Addams calls on educators and social workers to demand useful education for children so that they are better prepared for a life in industry.
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An excerpt from Addams' March 22 speech at Faneuil Hall to the Boston Equal Suffrage Association and the Women's Trade Union League on the changes in women's work brought about by factory work.
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Addams warns adults of some aspects of trade schools for boys. The speech was given at the first convention of the National Society for the Promotion of Industrial Education on January 24, as part of a session entitled The Wage Earners' Benefit from Industrial Education.
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At the Sixth International Congress on Tuberculosis in Washington, D.C., Addams and Hamilton discuss "Economic Aspects of Tuberculosis" and why people living in poverty are more susceptible to the disease.
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An excerpt from Newer Ideals of Peace, Addams recounts some of the ways child labor has ruined the future of those children exposed to it.
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Excerpts from Addams' speech on educational opportunities wasted due to discrimination against immigrants.
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Addams' comments to striking girls about working conditions and labor organization. The strike, against the International Harvester Company, Deering Division, resulting in the shut down of the plant, putting 6,000 out of work. This is a portion of a longer article on the strike.
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Addams scores a plan by manufacturers to form an educational institution.
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Stenographic transcription of Addams' speech to the National Arbitration and Peace Congress in New York City. Addams discusses a rejection of warfare and military might as the only way of displaying patriotism, suggesting instead that we seek examples in industrial progress.
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Addams' speech to the first National Arbitration and Peace Congress of America, given in New York at an evening session at Carnegie Hall. Addams discusses a rejection of warfare and military might as the only means to display patriotism, suggesting instead that people look for examples in industrial progress. The speech was published in the Congress Proceedings, and later edited by hand.
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Addams' speech to the first National Arbitration and Peace Congress of America, given in New York at an evening session at Carnegie Hall. Addams discusses a rejection of warfare and military might as the only means to display patriotism, suggesting instead that people look for examples in industrial progress. The speech was published in the Congress Proceedings.
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Addams' speech before the National Child Labor Committee in Cincinnati calls for government regulations to protect women and children.
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Addams asks Kelley for some clarification before she takes a matter to the president of Sears, Roebuck Co., and she sends news about a suffrage meeting and Lillian Wald's health.
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