84 results

  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, views on education"
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Addams speaks about women college graduates and their role in public reform.
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Addams, discussing the main reasons for why child labor is wrong, how it came to be, and who can be blamed for it.
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A compilation of Addams' writings on reducing child labor, and increasing playgrounds and education for working-class children.
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Addams argues that women's colleges should train women for public service.
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Prosser informs Addams that the National Society for Vocational Education has appointed her to a committee on women and girls.
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Addams argues that the improvement of education for children starts with the improvement of their work conditions and environment and that a national effort is necessary so that every child is protected. This is the second article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and a woman's role to affect change.
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Addams provides an argument against literacy tests for immigrants, proposed by the Burnett Bill recently pased by the U.S. House of Representatives.
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An essay collected from Addams' writings on children, child labor, and recreational opportunities in the city.
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Small asks Addams to consider taking a teaching position at the University of Chicago.
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Addams refuses to support Boyle's contention that academics should refrain from political activities.
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Addams advocates for the education of young children alongside Young in the form of vocational training.
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Addams argues that the improvement of education for children starts with the improvement of their work conditions and environment and that a national effort is necessary so that every child is protected.
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Addams discusses the formation of the Progressive Party and its ideals, starting with children's needs. She notes that the party supports efforts to curb child labor, and to encourage education. This is one of a series of articles she prepared for the Central Press Association as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
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In this commencement address, Addams discusses the changes in perception of women's intelligence and argues that the time is ripe for women's intelligence to hold sway. The speech was later published in the Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly.
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In this commencement address, Addams discusses the changes in perception of women's intelligence and argues that the time is ripe for women's intelligence to hold sway.
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Addams connects woman suffrage with social work, arguing that women's voices are necessary for the improvement of social and labor conditions and that all -- social workers and housewives -- have a stake in making laws, which protect women, children, and families. Addams likely gave this speech on multiple occasions. This was also published in the Chicago Tribune on February 4, 1912.
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Addams expounds upon the role of religious education in keeping youth from vice and examines the difficult standards to which young women are held. This is the third in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil later in the year.
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In this speech at the National Conference of Charities and Correction in Boston, Addams calls on educators and social workers to demand useful education for children so that they are better prepared for a life in industry.
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Trice asks Addams to lend her support to the Lincoln-Trice Normal and Industrial Institute for Colored Men and Women.
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Addams offers a strong indictment against old fashioned religious education and argues that the church, in order to encourage modern youth to see the validity of religion, must engage the realities and distractions of urban life.
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Bok asks Addams to revise an article submitted on religious education, asking her to edit it with an eye toward the appeal of a more general audience.
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In this draft, Addams offers a strong indictment against old fashioned religious education and argues that the church, in order to encourage modern youth to see the validity of religion, must engage the realities and distractions of urban life.
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Interview with Jane Addams on education and public schooling.
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Addams speaks to the Chicago Sinai congregation on the value of theater for moral teaching of the young.
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An excerpt from Addams's 1897 speech to the National Educational Association on the indoctrination of children into industry.
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Addams compares the United States' treatment of women and children in labor to the ways of European countries. This speech was given at public meeting associated with the Conference on the Care of Dependent Children, in Washington, D.C. on January 25, 1909.
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Keeping her promise to McCormick, Addams sends her speech about playgrounds.
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In this address, given to the Annual Meeting of the National Education Association in 1908, Addams speaks of the importance of education within the immigrant community and the role of teachers as bridges between the families of students and American society.
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Speaking to the National Education Association meeting, Addams discusses her thoughts on educating mentally, morally or physically "deficient" children.
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