40 results

  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, and the government"
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Addams' 1894 talk on the Pullman strike was only published in 1912 in the Survey. She analyzes the strike, drawing comparisons between George Pullman and his workers, and Shakespeare's King Lear and Cordelia.

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In 1894, Addams gave a speech to the Chicago Woman's Club and the Twentieth Century Club about the Pullman strike. The speech was not published until 18 years later, in the November 1912 Survey. In it, she draws comparisons between the key players in the strike, particularly George Pullman, and Shakespeare's dysfunctional royal family.
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Addams discusses the economic, social, and human toll of unemployment and suggests some creative solutions being employed in England.
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Addams talks about the settlement as a bulwark against anti-immigrant persecution, using examples of Russian anarchists.
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Lindsey thanks Addams for her help with the Ludlow Massacre and tells of the threats he as received and his anxiety over rising violence in the United States.
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Stangeland arranges a meeting between Addams and Walter Page at the American Embassy.
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Addams endorse Woodrow Wilson in the 1916 election because of his track record of respect for providing individuals with opportunity.
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Thomas conveys to Wilson the request of the Woman's Peace Party for an inauguration ceremony with less emphasis on the military.
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Addams and forty-five other women petition Post to halt the deportation of Emmeline Pankhurst.
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Addams and Aylward request an appointment with Wilson to discuss an emergency peace conference.
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Addams discusses deciding who to vote for in the Presidential Election.
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Addams informs Page that forty-two Americans set sail on the Noordam and she requests aid with British Admiralty.
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Addams and forty-five other women petition Wilson to halt the deportation of Emmeline Pankhurst.
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Addams discusses the economic, social, and human toll of unemployment and offers some creative solutions to the problem being employed in England. This is the ninth article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and women's roles in affecting change.
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Lanthrop asks Addams for help with a pamphlet on sex education.
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Addams explains the evils of unpaid prison labor. This is the fourth article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and a woman's role to affect change.
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Addams defends her involvement in partisan politics and argues that philanthropy and politics must often be partners in charting a better future for families and for communities. This is the first article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and a woman's roles in affecting change.
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In a humorous effort to render the male arguments against woman suffrage absurd, Addams describes a hypothetical world in which women hold power and men are asking for the vote. This is the sixth article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and women's roles affecting change.
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Addams offers a counter narrative to the idea that the U.S. government should limit immigration, arguing that immigrants provide benefits to society and are deserving of protections under the law. This is the fifth article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and a woman's role to affect change.
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An excerpt from a letter by Addams, Lillian Wald and Mary McDowell to labor unions, seeking an investigation of working conditions for women and children.
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Villard suggests points that Addams might argue in her testimony before the Senate Military Affairs committee, highlighting the political and costs drawbacks of militarization.
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Addams provides an argument against literacy tests for immigrants, proposed by the Burnett Bill recently pased by the U.S. House of Representatives.
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Addams discusses how philanthropic activities become political activities, citing instances from her own work in Chicago.
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Stovall has arranged for Addams to meet the president of Switzerland to discuss peace activities.
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Addams likens prison labor camps to slavery and discusses how unpaid prison labor impacts the families of the inmates.
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Addams' speech to the American Sociological Society argues that social interaction is the key to advancing society. In urban areas, city governments need to provide varied and organized recreations to build community.
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Addams was one of the guests at President Wilson's state dinner held at the White House.
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Newspaper report of a leaflet Addams and others produced in opposition to the enlargement of the U.S. Navy.
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Addams testifies on the lack of statistics available to adequately analyze the welfare of children in Chicago and argues that a bureau could collect and disseminate such data.
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