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  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, and African-Americans"
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Addams expounds upon the role of religious education in keeping youth from vice and examines the difficult standards to which young women are held. This is the third in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil later in the year.
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In this address given at the 13th Annual Conference for the Study of the Negro Problems held at Atlanta University, Addams discusses the difficulties immigrants face in Chicago.
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The anonymous African-American correspondent chastises Addams for sacrificing African American rights for woman suffrage.
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Addams is one of a number of people who sign a call for a conference to examine the situation of African-Americans since emancipation. Various versions of the call appeared in newspapers across the country.
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Woolley praises Addams for standing up for African-Americans at the Progressive Party Convention.
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The Colored Woman's Civic Club thanks Addams for her support black rights at the Progressive Party Convention.
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Article about the creation of a permanent committee, on which Jane Addams was invited to serve, coming out of the Conference on the Status of the Negro.
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Wells informs Ware that Addams is out of the city, and his letter has been given to Sophonisba Breckenridge, who in interested in the advancement of African-Americans.
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Deknatel writes on Addams behalf, disputing an article which states that she is in favor of lynching African-Americans.
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Hawkins praises Addams' Twenty Years at Hull House and asks her to donate a copy to the black Social Settlement in Washington, D.C.
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Scott thanks Addams for her stand on behalf of African Americans at the Progressive Party Convention.
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Pinkett praises Addams' defense of immigrants in her article in Charities and Commons and relates the persecution of immigrants to that of African-Americans.
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Addams chastises American society for failing to live up to the ideals of the Emancipation Proclamation and demands political equality for black Americans.
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Addams chastises American society for failing to live up to the ideals of the Emancipation Proclamation and demands political equality for black Americans.
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Addams asks Blaine for a donation to support an African American settlement in Chicago.
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Addams asks Blaine to assist Oswald Villard with the organization of Chicago efforts related to the Association of the Advancement of Colored People.
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Addams writes Crane about a misunderstanding in regard to the leadership of the National American Woman Suffrage Convention in Louisville, Kentucky.
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Addams notes a discussion in the news about creating segregated schools and is calling a meeting at Hull-House to discuss it.
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Addams reports on events in New Orleans at the Methodist Missionary Conference, including attending a talk by Booker T. Washington. She also writes about changes in her travel plans and how she wishes that Smith was with her.
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Addams thanks Baker for sending her a copy of his book, Following the Color Line: An Account of Negro Citizenship in the American Democracy.
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Addams notes that she sent Haldeman a copy of Du Bois' "Soul of the Black Folk," and asks after Marcet's health.
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Addams tells Breckinridge that she has doubts that discrimination against African-Americans in the federal government is increasing.
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Addams sends Breckinridge three letters about lynchings, including one from Oswald Garrison Villard that encloses a newspaper clipping about a brutal lynching in Florida.
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Addams declines Du Bois invitation to the Atlanta Conference on Negro Problems due to a glut of commencement speeches on her schedule.
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Jones reacts to an article that Addams sent him on the Progressive Party, focusing on her statements about African Americans and the peace movement.
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Ransom praises Addams' public opposition to the exclusion of black delegates at the Progressive Party Convention.
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Addams discusses her impressions of the campaign and election results in a speech to the City Club on November 13; the report of the event was published on November 27. Other speakers at the event were not included.
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McDowell complains to Addams that Roosevelt made a mistake by courting white Southerners and ignoring the needs of southern African-Americans.
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