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  • Tags: Woman Suffrage
  • Item Type: Text
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Addams forwards to McCulloch a letter with questions about suffrage and protective legislation.
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Addams invites Thomas to speak about suffrage as part of a second push to secure municipal voting rights for women in Chicago.
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Addams asks Whitlock to visit Hull-House and make a speech to a woman's suffrage group while in Chicago.
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Whitlock declines Addams' request to lecture before a suffrage committee, but he accepts her offer to visit Hull-House.
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Addams asks Booth to thank Anita McCormick Blaine for her donation to the the Committee for the Extension of Municipal Suffrage for Chicago Women.
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Nicholes invites Whitlock and his wife to a suffrage meeting and to stay at Hull-House when he is in Chicago.
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Ella Stewart sends Whitlock a check to cover his expenses for traveling to Chicago to speak with suffragists.
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Addams argues that when women vote, they help to improve protection for children and to the general public.
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Addams sends Haldeman a postcard regarding the suffrage movement.
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In terms of securing their rights, Addams argues that women in America lag behind their European counterparts.
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Addams discusses the movement for municipal suffrage for women in Chicago, arguing that it will help improve schools, public health, and sanitation.
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Addams argues women's need for the vote so that they can  perform their duties to family and the nation.
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Addams argues that American women are behind their European peers with regard to individual rights.
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Bok congratulates Addams on her suffrage articles for the Ladies Home Journal.
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Addams apologizes for holding on to Andrews' article too long and praises him for its views on suffrage and protective legislation.
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Addams argues for women to have the vote in order that they may continue to perform their duties to family and to home in the modern world, where responsibilities, like feeding their children and keeping them safe, are no long directly within their control.
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Addams tells a story to illustrate the danger of looking at the struggle for women's rights through rose-colored glasses.
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Bacon praises Addams' book The Spirit of Youth and the City Streets and writes about the progressive activities in which the women of her town are engaged.
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Addams writes Thomas regarding her article about woman suffrage in the Ladies' Home Journal.
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In an interview with James Evan Crown, Addams discusses the impact that woman suffrage is having on society. Addams later denied having taken part in this interview, specifically her comments on the poor.
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Addams pays tribute to Theodore Parker at a Memorial Banquet in Chicago, where she praised his anti-slavery work and support of black suffrage, blamed his generation for not extending suffrage to women, and surmised that Parker would have ultimately supported the franchise for women had he lived longer.
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Sweet asks Addams to contribute some articles to her publishing company.
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Addams writes Stewart regarding her pledge to the Illinois Equal Suffrage Association.
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A review article that includes excerpts of Addams' Twenty Years at Hull House and discusses her work at Hull-House and her contributions to Chicago.
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Addams' short argument for woman suffrage that women's voices are needed for the health and beauty of the cities.
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Addams gave this lecture at least two times; once at the February 2 meeting of the New York City Women's Political Union, and again on February 14 at the Boston School Voters' League. In the lecture, she discusses the philosophical relationship between women and the State and argues for the value of women in government, leading to the importance of woman suffrage.
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In this first installment of "Why Women Should Vote," Addams argues that antiquated notions of being a "lady" work against the woman suffrage movement.
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The second in a four-part series arguing for woman suffrage.
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Addams argues for woman suffrage claiming that women need to protect their legal rights.
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In the final installment of "Why Women Should Vote," Addams highlights why women need the ballot and argues that woman suffrage is centuries overdue and necessary for women to protect themselves.

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