3507 results

  • Written by: Addams, Jane (1860-1935)
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Addams's secretary asks DeGraff whether she plans to join Addams at The Hague.
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Addams, explains how a league of neutral nations can be used to begin negotiations to end the war.
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Addams speaks about the benefits of public parks to the community. The remarks were published on July 2, 1908.
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Addams shares a memory of Caroline Severance, who recently passed away.
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Addams uses the story of the devil-baby to discuss how the beliefs in fairy tales are still an influencing factor in people's thinking.
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Addams' 1894 talk on the Pullman strike was only published in 1912 in the Survey. She analyzes the strike, drawing comparisons between George Pullman and his workers, and Shakespeare's King Lear and Cordelia.

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In 1894, Addams gave a speech to the Chicago Woman's Club and the Twentieth Century Club about the Pullman strike. The speech was not published until 18 years later, in the November 1912 Survey. In it, she draws comparisons between the key players in the strike, particularly George Pullman, and Shakespeare's dysfunctional royal family.
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Addams argues that if the rulers of European countries lived among their people, they would see that labor and commerce were what made nations, not its military might.
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Newspaper excerpt of Addams' speech at the Ethical Culture Society, criticizing the buildup of armaments.
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Addams' speech before the National Child Labor Committee in Cincinnati calls for government regulations to protect women and children.
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Arguing that white slavery requires an organized movement to defeat it, Addams provides examples from cases in Chicago. This is the first in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil in 1912.
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Addams explores the economic plight of young women that often drives them to prostitution and white slavery. This is the second in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil in 1912.
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Addams expounds upon the role of religious education in keeping youth from vice and examines the difficult standards to which young women are held. This is the third in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil later in the year.
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Addams identifies the dangers that face young women alone in a city and discusses the lack of support for them. This is the fourth in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil later in the year.
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Addams discusses how social movements can help alleviate vice, providing examples such as crusades against diseases and organized opposition to the white slave trade. This is the final article in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil later in the year.
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Page proofs of "Chapter V: Social Control," the final article in a five-part series, which would ultimately be published as A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil later in the year.
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Addams discusses the impact of woman suffrage on India, Burma, Japan, and China.
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An essay collected from Addams' writings on children, child labor, and recreational opportunities in the city.
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A compilation of Addams' writings on reducing child labor, and increasing playgrounds and education for working-class children.
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Addams relates the story of meeting Tolstoy and his criticism of wealthy activists.
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In this narratively rich article in McClure's, Addams reflects on her meeting with Tolstoy in Russia in 1896, on her admiration for his principles, and on her pragmatic approach to good work in the urban, industrial context of Hull-House and its diverse surroundings.
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Addams's speech on her return from Europe detailed the work of the International Congress of Women and her ideas on peace.
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Addams spoke at a meeting of Chicago Russians to hear Madame Katherine Breshkovsky speak on Russian freedom.
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Addams spoke at a memorial meeting for Iroquois Theater fire victims, organized by the Chicago Teacher's Federation, about the dangers of overlooking violations in fear of being seen as bad people.
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Addams discusses her work with the International Congress of Women, the delegations to European leaders, and her views on the need for peace. The event was held at the Chicago Auditorium and attended by both peace activists and the general public, and chaired by Charles L. Hutchinson.
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Addams discusses the role of public education in fostering democracy. The speech was given during the closing session of the General Congress of Religions, on June 1, and published on July 27.
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Addams discusses the goals of the Woman's Peace Party and hopes that a Conference of Neutral Nations will begin negotiations to end the war. The speech was given at the first annual meeting of the Woman's Peace Party.
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Addams offers a memorial to Joseph Tilton Bowen and describes the creation of the Hull-House country club named after him.
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Addams discusses the problem of inducing people to engage with the peace movement rather than following more nationalistic and warlike activities.
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