78 results

  • Mentions: National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA)
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Hastings writes to Addams to express her feelings about the peace movement and Addams' work, citing her own experiences with the horrors of war as examples.
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Addams gives a memorial address for Shaw, highlighting Shaw's involvement in the woman's suffrage movement and religious education.
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Addams discusses how older women can contribute to society in beneficial ways by providing examples. The article was published in the Ladies' Home Journal.
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Addams will be traveling frequently in the next few weeks but will continue to write.
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Addams invites Breckinridge to speak at the annual meeting of the National American Woman Suffrage Association in Nashville.
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Kent suggests moving the National American Woman Suffrage Convention meeting back so that delegates working on electoral campaigns can attend.
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Breckinridge discusses the upcoming National American Woman Suffrage Association conference in Nashville, particularly the host location.
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Addams sends a check to the National American Woman Suffrage Association.
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An excerpt from Addams' November 24 speech to the National Woman Suffrage Association meeting highlights her ideas about mother's pensions, immigrant socialization, and recreation.
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Addams' keynote address before the National American Woman Suffrage Association meeting in Philadelphia argues that women must have the ballot in order to maintain their moral and familial role for the betterment of society.
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Addams argues for women's increased participation in politics and defends her decision to back a political party.
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Addams argues for women's increased participation in politics and defends her decision to back a political party. This is one of a series of articles she prepared for the Central Press Association as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
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Addams writes James about plans for a suffrage meeting in Milwaukee.
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James sends Addams a descriptive and financial report of the campaign activities of the National American Woman Suffrage Association.
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A pamphlet containing quotes on war and peace from a wide variety of people.
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Addams defends her decision to support the Progressive Party in the face of criticism from woman suffrage activists who prefer non-partisan activism.
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Addams connects woman suffrage with social work, arguing that women's voices are necessary for the improvement of social and labor conditions and that all -- social workers and housewives -- have a stake in making laws, which protect women, children, and families. Addams likely gave this speech on multiple occasions. This speech was also published in the Chicago Tribune on February 4, 1912.
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Camp apologizes to Addams as the National American Woman Suffrage Association newsletter listed her name as an officer.
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Breckinridge cannot attend the Washington meeting; she also discusses board issues between Addams and Anna Howard Shaw at NAWSA.
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Catt discusses an upcoming conference on woman suffrage and tensions in the movement regarding peace.
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Addams details her plans to issue invitations to specific women's organizations rather than a general call for the upcoming peace meeting in Washington.
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Bramhall discusses the activities of the local women's clubs with suffrage and peace in St. Paul.