47 results

  • Subject is exactly "political parties"
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Schwartz tells Addams about his work with citizenship classes in Chicago public schools and commends her for her neutral political stance.
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Kellogg would like Addams to read some articles he has written on the British Labor movement.
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The National Progressive Serivice suggests a draft constitution for state organizations, offering guidance for organization, administration and operations.
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Addams' November 30 address at the annual meeting of the National American Woman Suffrage Association discusses the meaning of suffrage, the changing political climate, and the connections between politics and social improvement.
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In this published version of a speech given to the Chicago City Club on November 7, Addams discusses party politics, the viability of independent parties, and the possibilities of women's role in municipal elections in Illinois.
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Addams discusses party politics, the viability of independent parties, and the possibilities of women's role in municipal elections in Illinois. This speech was given to the Chicago City Club.
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Addams describes her experiences at the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and its appeal to labor and women.
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Addams discusses elections and the role of partisan politics, arguing that political pragmatism is required for social action.
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Addams reports on the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and her dismay about the conventions unjust treatment of African-Americans. This is one of a series of articles she prepared as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
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Addams seconds the nomination of Theodore Roosevelt as the Progressive Party candidate for the presidency.
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Addams apologizes for inaccurate information about the Socialist Party's endorsement of woman suffrage, which the Progressive Party circulated. The editor of the Appeal to Reason comments both before and after the published version of her letter.
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Rumely advises Pinchot that regardless of the outcome of the election, the Progressive Party must become a permanent organization. He provides suggestions on how to accomplish that.
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Kellor writes Addams about the defeat of woman suffrage in Ohio, arguing that women should join the Progressive Party .
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Addams tells Kent she discussed his letter with Roosevelt and other Progressives and that they seek cooperation with the Republican parties, but refuse to be swallowed up.
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A "Bull Moose" warns Addams of a trap that the other political parties are planning for the Progressive Party.
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A proposal for a National Progressive League, outlining its functions and rules.
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Tarbell asks Addams's advice on whether a journalist should join a political party or remain unaffiliated.
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Lewis criticizes Addams and the Progressive Party for claiming to be the only party supporting women's suffrage, as the Socialist Party has supported the suffrage movement since its founding in 1901.
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Walden asks Addams to retract a Progressive Party statement that it is the sole party of woman suffrage.
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Jones reacts to an article that Addams sent him on the Progressive Party, focusing on her statements about African Americans and the peace movement.
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Woolley thanks Addams for sending an article and discusses her views on Theodore Roosevelt.
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McKelway commends Addams for her work with the Progressive Party but tells her he supports Wilson.
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Walsh tells Lathrop that all three political parties have agreed to use public school buildings for political discussions.
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Hapgood writes Addams about his thoughts on the African-American vote in the upcoming election.
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Smith questions Addams' support of Theodore Roosevelt and suggests she is afraid of socialism.
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Casselberry criticizes Addams' support of Theodore Roosevelt and his corrupt backer, industrialist George Perkins.
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Cook thanks Addams for her defense of black Americans and urges her to continue to be a voice during the Progressive Party campaign for the presidency.
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McDowell compliments Addams' influence on the Progressive Party platform.
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