13 results

  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, views on history"
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Addams warns of the dangers of the new nationalistic favor sweeping the world following the war. This article was a version of her speech to the American Sociological Society on December 29, 1919.
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Addams discusses the stigma placed on illegitimate children at a Children's Bureau conference that explored legal protections for illegitimate children. The speech was titled Women's Special Interests as Issues in the National Campaign at the conference and published with a different title.
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Addams warns of the dangers of the new nationalistic favor sweeping the world following the war.
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Addams' discussion of the impact of dogmatic nationalism in the light of anti-immigrant sentiment. This paper was given to the American Sociological Society.
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A draft of Addams' discussion of the impact of dogmatic nationalism in the light of anti-immigrant sentiment. This paper was given at the American Sociological Society meeting, held in Chicago from December 29-31, 1919.
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Addams discusses the impact of dogmatic nationalism in the light of anti-immigrant sentiment. This paper was given at the American Sociological Society meeting, held in Chicago from December 29-31, 1919.
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Addams discusses her childhood, the influence of her father and Lincoln, and her early thoughts on morality and responsibility to the community. This is the first of six articles excerpted from Twenty Years at Hull-House.
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Addams publishes the first chapter of Newer Ideals of Peace, in Charities and the Commons, arguing for a new approach to peace propaganda. She makes a direct appeal to sentiments and opinions to oppose the exploitation of the weak and to reject of blind militarism.
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Addams finds the causes for breakdowns in municipal administration in eighteenth century idealism that foundered against nineteenth century increases in population, industry and commerce. The speech was originally given on September 25, 1904 at the International Congress of Arts and Sciences in St. Louis, MO.
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Addams finds the causes for breakdowns in municipal administration in eighteenth century idealism that foundered against nineteenth century increases in population, industry and commerce. This speech was originally given on September 25, 1904 at the International Congress of Arts and Sciences in St. Louis, MO.
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Addams explores lessons learned from the 19th century, and sees the greatest menace for the future as the lack of faith in the people and an over reliance on national pride.
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