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  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, autobiographical views"
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Beck interviews Addams about her trip to Madison as a child.
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Addams reflects on Theodore Roosevelt's visits to Chicago.
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Addams gives Maddox information on her degrees for the program of the Rockford College commencement.
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Addams sends Linn condolences on the death of her father.
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Addams seeks Hull's advice about joining the Neutral Conference for Continuous Mediation and remarks about her religious affiliation.
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Addams is disappointed that Wald can't attend the International Women's Congress and considers asking Maud Nathan to attend, but fears she might be pro-German.
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At the Lincoln Center, Addams and others speak in memory of Colonel John A. Davis. This excerpt is part of a larger article and only Addams' words are included.
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Addams describes why Botticelli's Fortitude is her favorite piece of art. Her description appeared with others by  leading Americans about their favorites.
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Addams describes her experiences at the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and its appeal to labor and women.
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Addams reports on the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and her dismay about the conventions unjust treatment of African-Americans. This is one of a series of articles she prepared as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
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Addams offers a biographical justification of why she has entered politics and joined the Progressive Party. The article was published in October 1912.
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In this narratively rich article in McClure's, Addams reflects on her meeting with Tolstoy in Russia in 1896, on her admiration for his principles, and on her pragmatic approach to good work in the urban, industrial context of Hull-House and its diverse surroundings.
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Addams relates the story of meeting Tolstoy and his criticism of wealthy activists.
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Addams discusses the many programs at Hull-House that appeal to its immigrant neighbors and the additional value that their neighbors bring to the programs.
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Addams describes the poverty of the Hull-House neighborhood in the early days of her work there. She discusses the lack of security and loneliness of the elderly, as well as child labor.
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Addams writes about finding a location for her settlement and the early days of settling into the neighborhood and developing the ideas for their work. This is the third of six articles excerpted from Twenty Years at Hull-House.
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Addams' autobiographical account of her education at Rockford College and her travels in Europe. This is the second of six articles excerpted from Twenty Years at Hull-House.
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Addams discusses her childhood, the influence of her father and Lincoln, and her early thoughts on morality and responsibility to the community. This is the first of six articles excerpted from Twenty Years at Hull-House.
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Addams recalls stories from her childhood meetings with Civil War Colonel John A. Davis, as part of a dedication of a guest chamber at the Abraham Lincoln Center settlement in his honor. The speech was published in a pamphlet on the event.
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Wilmarth praises Addams' autobiography and offers personal reflections on her own life.
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Walsh praises Addams for her autobiographical articles and suggests she read his book.