80 results

  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, and labor movement"
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Addams describes her experiences at the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and its appeal to labor and women.
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Addams discusses working conditions for women and advocates for a minimum wage for female workers.
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Addams described the Progressive Party's support for the dependents of prisoners, by allowing wages they earn in prison to be sent to their families. It also supports calls for social insurance that would protect the poor in case of injury or old age.
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Addams describes the Progressive Party's pledge to support new immigrants by creating protection for industrial laborers.
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Addams argues for the implementation of a minimum wage for female workers.
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Addams reports on the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and her dismay about the conventions unjust treatment of African-Americans. This is one of a series of articles she prepared as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
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Addams offers a biographical justification of why she has entered politics and joined the Progressive Party. The article was published in October 1912.
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Addams describes the Progressive Party's pledge to support new immigrants by creating protection for industrial laborers. This is one of a series of articles she prepared for the Central Press Association as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
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Addams described the Progressive Party's support for the dependents of prisoners, by allowing wages they earn in prison to be sent to their families. It also supports calls for social insurance that would protect the poor in case of injury or old age. This is one of a series of articles prepared for the Central Press Association as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
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Addams lays out the Progressive Party's pledge to working women--the prohibition of night work, the institution of the eight-hour day, and a minimum wage in sweated industry. This is one of a series of articles she prepared for the Central Press Association for the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
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Andrews asks Addams, as a member of the Committee on Unemployment, to assist with a report for the American Association for Labor Legislation.
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At the inaugural conference of the Women's Trade Union League, held at the Berkeley Lyceum in New York, Addams argues that women workers should unionize to improve working conditions.
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Newspaper account of Addams's comments after all-night efforts to settle a teamsters' strike ended in failure. These quotes are part of a larger news article on the negotiations.
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Addams' remarks at the January 13 City Club's Housewarming meeting on Labor called for bettering relations between labor unions and the City Club.
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Addams gives arguments for woman's suffrage, stressing that working class need it to be able to control some aspects of their lives.
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Addams' speaks to the Consumer's League about the dangers of sweat shops and child labor.
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On behalf of the U.S. Secretary of Labor, Malone invites Addams to serve on the Committee on Organization of the Congress on Social Insurance.
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A newspaper report that includes an excerpt from Addams' talk to the Hull-House Woman's Club on the object and history of the Women's Trade Union League.
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Addams was one of six people who commented on John R. Commons' paper at the American Sociological Society meeting in Madison, Wisconsin, in December 1907. Addams' comments were published in the proceedings.
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Addams introduces the Chicago Industrial Exhibit's goals and content for publication in its Handbook.
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Addams gave this speech at a public meeting held by the Society for the Promotion of Industrial Education, at Cooper Union, along with Henry Pritchett, Frank Vanderlip, Frederick Fish, Nicholas Murray Butler, Frank P. Sargent, and others. Addams' appeal, unlike the other speakers, identified with the plight of working people and argued that industrial education would better their lives.
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Addams compares the United States' treatment of women and children in labor to the ways of European countries. This speech was given at public meeting associated with the Conference on the Care of Dependent Children, in Washington, D.C. on January 25, 1909.
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Addams sends Robins a copy of her suggestions (not found) for Alexander McCormick.
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Addams discusses the evil effects of child labor on labor practices and education.